Reign

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For other uses, see Reign (disambiguation).

A reign is the period of a person's or dynasty's occupation of the office of monarch of a nation (e.g. Saudi Arabia, Belgium, Andorra), of a people (e.g., the Franks, the Zulus) or of a spiritual community (e.g., Roman Catholicism, Tibetan Buddhism, Nizari Ismailism). In most hereditary monarchies and some elective monarchies (e.g. Holy Roman Empire) there have been no limits on the duration of a sovereign's reign or incumbency, nor is there a term of office. Thus, a reign usually lasts until the monarch dies, unless the monarchy itself is abolished or the monarch abdicates or is deposed.

In elective monarchies, there may be a fixed period of time for the duration of the monarch's tenure in office (e.g. Malaysia).

The term of a reign can be indicated with the abbreviation "r." after a sovereign's name, such as the following:

George VI, King of the United Kingdom (r. 1936–1952)

Regnal periods[edit]

A reign can be ended in three ways:

Abdications[edit]

Abolitions[edit]

King Constantine II of Greece reigned from 1963 until the abolition of the Greek monarchy in 1973.

King Humbert II of Italy reigned for only a few weeks in 1946 before the abolition of the Italian Monarchy.

Tsar Nicholas II of Russia reigned from 1894 to 1917 during the Russian Revolution when he was forced to abdicate and the Russian Empire was overthrown.

King Louis XVI of France reigned from the 1770s until the overthrow of the monarchy in 1792 and his execution the following year.

Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi of Iran reigned for more than 37 years (1941–1979) until he fled during the Iranian Revolution, which replaced 2500 years of monarchy with the Islamic Republic of Iran. The Shah died the following year and is buried in Cairo.

See also[edit]