Reiyūkai

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From Tokyo Tower main observatory

Reiyūkai (霊友会 Spiritual-Friendship-Association?), or Reiyūkai Shakaden is a Japanese Buddhist new religious movement founded in 1925 by Kakutarō Kubo (1892-1944)[1] and Kimi Kotani (1901-1971).[2] It is a lay organization—meaning that there are no priests—associated with Nichiren Buddhism. Reiyūkai considers itself the grandfather of lay-based new religions devoted to the Lotus Sutra and ancestor veneration.[3]

"Shakaden" in the name Reiyūkai Shakaden means that this organization lays extra emphasis on the veneration of Shakyamuni Buddha, the founder of Buddhism. Further offshoots from Reiyūkai are Risshō Kōsei Kai, Bussho Gonenkai Kyōdan, Myōchikai Kyōdan, and Myōdōkai Kyōdan. Reiyūkai membership currently stands at 1.58 million members, with the majority living in Japan.[4]

The Reiyūkai has a representative in the neo-nationalist Nippon Kaigi (Japan Conference) which sees its mission to promote patriotic education, the revision of the constitution, and support for official visits to Yasukuni Shrine.[5][6][7][8][9] Former Tokyo governor Shintaro Ishihara is a believer and writes in reiyūkai publications.[10]

Literature[edit]

  • Buswell, Robert E., Lopez, Donald S. Jr. (2014). The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism, Princeton: Princeton University Press, p. 709 (Reiyūkai)
  • Hardacre, Helen (1984). Lay Buddhism in Contemporary Japan: Reiyukai Kyodan, Princeton Univ Press. ISBN 0691072841
  • Hardacre, Helen (1979). Sex-role norms and values in Reiyūkai, Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 6 (3), 445-460
  • Kubo, Katsuko; O'Drobinak, Charles J.; trans. (1982). Reflections in search of myself, Tokyo: Sangaku Publishing
  • Kubo Tsugunari, Yuyama Akira (tr.) The Lotus Sutra. Revised 2nd ed. Berkeley, Calif. : Numata Center for Buddhist Translation and Research 2007. ISBN 978-1-886439-39-9
  • Montgomery, Daniel (1991). Fire in the Lotus, The Dynamic Religion of Nichiren, London: Mandala, ISBN 1852740914

References[edit]

  1. ^ Buswell, Robert E., Lopez, Donald S. Jr. (2014). The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism, Princeton: Princeton University Press, p. 449
  2. ^ Buswell, Robert E., Lopez, Donald S. Jr. (2014). The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism, Princeton: Princeton University Press, p. 443
  3. ^ Komoto Mitsugi: The Place of Ancestors in the New Religions: The Case of Reiyûkai-Derived Groups. In: Inoue Nobutaka, New Religions, Contemporary Papers on Japanese Religion 2, Institute for Japanese Culture and Classics, Kokugakuin University 1991. ISBN4-905853-00-1
  4. ^ Pokorny, Lukas (2011). Neue religiöse Bewegungen in Japan heute: ein Überblick [New Religious Movements in Japan Today: a Survey]. In: Hödl, Hans Gerald and Veronika Futterknecht, ed. Religionen nach der Säkularisierung. Festschrift für Johann Figl zum 65. Geburtstag, Wien: LIT, p. 186
  5. ^ Mullins, Mark R. (2012). The Neo-Nationalist Response to the Aum Crisis, Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 39 (1), 110-112
  6. ^ http://www.nipponkaigi.org/about/yakuin (japanese)
  7. ^ N. Onishi - New York Times, Dezember 17, 2006 , Japan Rightists Fan Fury Over North Korea Abductions
  8. ^ Christian G. Winkler (2011). The quest for Japan's new constitution: an analysis of visions and constitutional reform proposals, 1980-2009, London ; New York: Routledge, p.75
  9. ^ Daiki Shibuichi (2008). Japan's History Textbook Controversy, Electronic Journal of Contemporary Japanese Studies, Discussion Paper 4
  10. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20120121105625/http://www.reiyukai.or.jp/backnumber/backnumber_02_11.html (in Japanese)

External links[edit]