Religion in the Federated States of Micronesia

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Catholic church in Kolonia, Pohnpei

Several Protestant denominations, as well as the Roman Catholic Church, are present in every Micronesian state.[1] Most Protestant groups trace their roots to American Congregationalist missionaries.[1] On the island of Kosrae, the population is approximately 7,800; 95 percent are Protestants.[1] On Pohnpei, the population of 35,000 is evenly divided between Protestants and Catholics.[1] On Chuuk and Yap, an estimated 60 percent are Catholic and 40 percent are Protestant.[1] Religious groups with small followings include Baptists, Assemblies of God, Salvation Army, Seventh-day Adventists, Jehovah's Witnesses, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons), and the Baha'i Faith.[1] There is a small group of Buddhists on Pohnpei, with Buddhists forming about 0.7% of the population as of 2010.[1][2] Attendance at religious services is generally high; churches are well supported by their congregations and play a significant role in civil society.[1]

Most immigrants are Filipino Catholics who have joined local Catholic churches.[1] The Filipino Iglesia Ni Cristo also has a church in Pohnpei.[1] In the 1890s, on the island of Pohnpei, intermissionary conflicts and the conversion of clan leaders resulted in religious divisions along clan lines which persist today.[1] More Protestants live on the western side of the island, while more Catholics live on the eastern side.[1] Missionaries of many religious traditions are present and operate freely.[1] The Constitution provides for freedom of religion, and the Government generally respected this right in practice.[1] The US government received no reports of societal abuses or discrimination based on religious belief or practice in 2007.[1]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o International Religious Freedom Report 2007: Micronesia, Federated States of. United States Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor (September 14, 2007). This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  2. ^ Adherents in Micronesia