Reno Aces

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Reno Aces
Reno, Nevada
RenoAcesLogo.PNG RenoAcescap.PNG
Team logo Cap insignia
Class-level
Current Triple-A (2009–present)
Minor league affiliations
League Pacific Coast League
Conference Pacific Conference
Division Northern Division
Major league affiliations
Current Arizona Diamondbacks
Minor league titles
Class titles 2006, 2012
League titles 2006, 2012
Conference titles 2006, 2012
Division titles 2006, 2011, 2012
Team data
Nickname Reno Aces (2009–present)
Previous names Tucson Sidewinders (1998–2008)
Colors Navy Blue, White, Red
              
Ballpark Aces Ballpark (2009–present)
Previous parks Tucson Electric Park (1998–2008)
Owner(s)/
Operator(s)
SK Baseball, LLC
Manager Phil Nevin
General manager Rick Parr

The Reno Aces are a minor league baseball franchise based in Reno, Nevada, in the United States.[1] The team is a member of the Pacific Coast League and is the Triple-A affiliate of the Arizona Diamondbacks.

The franchise is owned by SK Baseball, LLC and is a part of the Pacific Conference's North Division along with the Tacoma Rainiers, Salt Lake Bees, and Colorado Springs Sky Sox. The Aces began their inaugural season on the road on April 10, 2009,[2] and played their home opener in the new Aces Ballpark on April 17, 2009.

History[edit]

Team origins[edit]

The Aces were originally known as the Tucson Sidewinders from 1998 to 2008. Before that, the team was first known as the Tucson Toros. They were Tucson's Triple-A baseball club, playing at Hi Corbett Field in midtown Tucson from 1969 to 1997. Part of the old 10-team configuration of the Pacific Coast League, the Toros won the PCL Championship in 1991 and 1993. The Toros were preceded by a number of other Tucson teams between 1915 and 1958, such as the Tucson Cowboys and the Tucson Lizards.

After the MLB expansion that added the Arizona Diamondbacks in Phoenix and Tampa Bay Devil Rays, the Toros moved to Fresno, California, as the Fresno Grizzlies. The Phoenix Firebirds relocated to Tucson, briefly became the Tucson Toros (1997), and then became the Sidewinders (1998), the Triple-A affiliate of the new Diamondbacks. This was accomplished by what amounted to a "swap" in ownership in 1997, with Firebirds owner Martin Stone purchasing the Toros and Toros owner Rick Holtzman receiving interest in the Firebirds. The Tucson team retained management and staff primarily from the Toros, and traces its history from the Toros rather than the Firebirds.[3]

The Phoenix Firebirds had played from 1958 through 1997 as an affiliate of the San Francisco Giants. The franchise joined the Pacific Coast League as a charter member in 1903 as the San Francisco Seals, relocating to Phoenix when the major league New York Giants moved to San Francisco. Seals alumni include Joe DiMaggio.

The Tucson Toros have been affiliated with the Chicago White Sox (1969–1972), the Oakland Athletics (1973–1976), the Texas Rangers (1977–1979), the Houston Astros (1980–1996), and the Milwaukee Brewers (1997 only, with one Diamondbacks prospect, Travis Lee, playing with them by special arrangement).[3] At the time of the change in venue and affiliations (1998), a new Tucson team name, the "Sidewinders" was chosen after a name the team contest was held.

The Toros have since become a member of the independent Golden Baseball League, adopting their previous Triple-A history from 1969 to 1997.

A new era – Reno Aces[edit]

In late 2007, it was formally announced that the Sidewinders would be moving to Reno, Nevada, after the 2008 season. A new 9,100-capacity venue, Aces Ballpark, was constructed for the team in downtown Reno.

The move forced the Reno Silver Sox of the independent Golden Baseball League to fold.[4] The franchise dropped the name "Sidewinders" in place of a new identity. Some fans suggested that the team should adopt or purchase the rights to the Silver Sox name from the GBL for the new PCL club, but that was ruled out as that team was, at that point (prior to folding), likely to relocate to Carson City, Nevada.[5] The Reno Aces introduced their new team name and logo at a press conference on September 23, 2008.[6] The nickname has a dual meaning: "ace" is a baseball slang term for a team's top pitcher, and the ace is the highest card in several card games (a reference to Nevada's legalized gambling history).

The Reno Aces were due to begin their inaugural season on Thursday, April 9, 2009, on the road against the Salt Lake Bees. However, the game was postponed due to the death of Anaheim Angels' Nick Adenhart (a Salt Lake alumnus), who was killed by a hit-and-run driver earlier in the day. Adenhart had played for the Bees during the 2008 season, and was remembered the next day in what was originally the second game in a four game series between the Aces and the Bees. The Bees beat the Aces 6–2 on Friday, April 10, 2009.[2] The Aces won their home opener at Aces Ballpark on Friday, April 17, 2009, 11–1 against the Salt Lake Bees, to an over-capacity sell-out crowd of 9,167.[7]

The Aces would make the playoffs for the first time in their history in 2011 failing to make it past the first round after losing the series to the Sacramento River Cats. The Aces made it to the playoffs the next season, eventually winning the 2012 Pacific Coast League title and the Triple-A National Championship Game against the Pawtucket Red Sox.

The Reno Aces Baseball Club hosted the nationally televised 2013 Triple-A All-Star Game on Wednesday, July 17, 2013.

Notable alumni[edit]

Season-by-season record[edit]

Season Division Affiliation Record Win % GB Finish Postseason
1998 PCL Southern Arizona 56-85 .401 23.5 Division: 4/4, League: 14/16 -
1999 PCL Southern Arizona 66-76 .465 7.5 Division: 4/4, League: 13/16 -
2000 PCL Southern Arizona 68-73 .482 20.5 Division: 3/4, League: 9/16 -
2001 PCL Southern Arizona 65-77 .458 9 Division: 4/4, League: 12/16 -
2002 PCL Southern Arizona 73-68 .518 10.5 Division: 2/4, League: 7/16 -
2003 PCL Southern Arizona 73-71 .507 19 Division: 3/4, League: 7/16 -
2004 PCL Southern Arizona 74-70 .514 5 Division: 2/4, League: 7/16 -
2005 PCL Southern Arizona 68-76 .472 12 Division: 3/4, League: 12/16 -
2006 PCL Southern Arizona 91-53 .632 - Division: 1/4, League: 1/16 Won PCCS vs. Salt Lake Bees, 3-1
Won PCLS vs. Round Rock Express, 3-0
Won Triple-A Championship vs. Toledo Mud Hens
2007 PCL Southern Arizona 75-67 .582 8 Division: 3/4, League: 7/16 -
2008 PCL Southern Arizona 60-82 .423 22 Division: 4/4, League: 15/16 -
2009 PCL Southern Arizona 79–64 .552 7 Division: 2/4, League: 3/16
2010 PCL Southern Arizona 69–74 .483 9.5 Division: 3/4, League: 11/16
2011 PCL Northern Arizona 77-67 .535 Division: 1/4, League: 4/16 Lost PCCS vs. Sacramento River Cats, 2-3
2012 PCL Northern Arizona 81-63 .563 Division: 1/4, League: 3/16 Won PCCS vs. Sacramento River Cats, 3-2
Won PCLS vs. Omaha Storm Chasers, 3-1
Won Triple-A Championship vs. Pawtucket Red Sox
2013 PCL Northern Arizona 60–84 .417 18.0 Division: 4/4, League: 15/16
Totals 1135–1150 .496

Roster[edit]

Reno Aces roster
Players Coaches/Other

Pitchers

Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders

Manager

Coaches


Injury icon 2.svg 7-day disabled list
* On Arizona Diamondbacks 40-man roster
∞ Reserve list
§ Suspended list
‡ Restricted list
# Rehab assignment
Roster updated April 5, 2014
Transactions
More MiLB rosters
Arizona Diamondbacks minor league players


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Reno's "Triple-A baseball team to be called Aces."[dead link] (Reno Gazette-Journal, September 23, 2008)
  2. ^ a b "Aces trumped in opener" (Reno Gazette-Journal, April 11, 2009)
  3. ^ a b "Team History."[dead link] Tucson Sidewinders. 2006. Retrieved on 9 April 2007.
  4. ^ Brodesky, Josh. "Toros could return in new incarnation."[dead link] The Arizona Daily Star. 11 November 2007. 26 December 2007.
  5. ^ "Silver Sox could be headed down the highway." (Reno Gazette-Journal, September 16, 2008)
  6. ^ "Triple-A team gets a name." (Reno Gazette-Journal, September 16, 2008)
  7. ^ "Aces win the home opener big, 11–1"[dead link] (Reno Gazette-Journal, April 17, 2009)

External links[edit]