Republic of Cuba (1902–59)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Republic of Cuba
República de Cuba

1902–1959
Flag Coat of arms
Anthem
La Bayamesa
"The Bayamo Song"
Capital Havana
Languages Spanish
Religion Roman Catholic
Government Republic
President
 -  1902–1906 Tomás Estrada Palma
 -  1952–1959 Fulgencio Batista
Governor-General
 -  1906 William Howard Taft
 -  1906–1909 Charles Edward Magoon
Prime Minister
 -  1940–1942 Carlos Saladrigas Zayas
 -  1958–1959 Gonzalo Güell
Legislature Congress
 -  Upper Chamber Senate
 -  Lower Chamber House of Representatives
Historical era Modern Era
 -  Platt Amendment 2 March 1901
 -  Constitution adopted 20 May 1902
 -  Cuban–American Treaty 17 February 1903
 -  Treaty of Relations 29 May 1934
 -  Cuban Revolution 1 January 1959
Today part of  Cuba
Part of a series on the
History of Cuba
Coat of arms of Cuba.svg
New Spain
Captaincy General of Cuba
United States Protectorate
Republic of Cuba (1902–59)
Topical
Portal icon Cuba portal

The Republic of Cuba (Spanish: República de Cuba) of 1902 to 1959, refers to the historical period in Cuba when Cuba seceded from US rule in 1902 in the aftermath of the Spanish-American War that took Cuba from Spanish rule in 1898 until the Cuban Revolution of 1959. Cuban independence from the United States was guaranteed in the Platt Amendment proposed to the United States Congress in 1901.[1] It was officially a representative democracy though at times it became controlled by a military junta. The Cuban Revolution of 1959 massively changed Cuban society, creating a socialist state and ended US economic dominance in Cuba.

Cuba during this time has been regarded as a client state of the United States.[2] In 1934, Cuba and the United States signed the Treaty of Relations in which Cuba was obligated to give preferential treatment of its economy to the United States, in exchange the United States gave Cuba a guaranteed 22 percent share of the US sugar market that later was amended to a 49 percent share in 1949.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Louis A. Pérez. Cuba Under the Platt Amendment, 1902-1934. Paperback reprint edition. Pittsburgh: Pittsburgh University Press, 1991. Pp. 54.
  2. ^ Louis A. Pérez. Cuba Under the Platt Amendment, 1902-1934. Paperback reprint edition. Pittsburgh: Pittsburgh University Press, 1991. Pp. xvi.
  3. ^ John Miller, Aaron Kenedi. Inside Cuba: the history, culture, and politics of an outlaw nation. New York, New York, USA: Marlowe & Company, 2003. Pp. 35-36