Request TV

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Request TV
Type Cable Pay-per-view television service
Country United States
Availability Nationwide
Owner Liberty Media and
Twentieth Century Fox
Launch date
November 1985
Dissolved June 30, 1998

Request TV, also known as Request Television, is a defunct pay-per-view service which was owned by Liberty Media and Twentieth Century Fox that was launched in November 1985. Request TV was originally owned by Reiss Media Enterprises; Group W Satellite Communications later purchased a 50% stake in the service in May 1989.[1] Twentieth Century Fox and Liberty Media acquired a combined majority interest in Reiss Media Enterprises in June 1992,[2] and bought out Group W's stake in Request TV.

One of their logos while they operated consisted of the letter "q" in Request as a film reel with a film strip coming out. Request TV offered first run movies and specials such as concerts, wrestling, boxing, etc. Request TV ended broadcasting on June 30, 1998, after Tele-Communications, Inc., then-owned by co-parent Liberty Media, declined to renew its contract to carry the service beyond that date.[3][4]

One of the major highlights of Request TV was that it was the first national television outlet to run Extreme Championship Wrestling programming, as documented by Paul Heyman in the DVD The Rise and Fall of ECW.

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References[edit]

  1. ^ "Group W Satellite Communications to become a partner with Reiss Media Enterprises in Request Television", PR Newswire, May 19, 1989. Retrieved March 2, 2011 from HighBeam Research.
  2. ^ Umstead, R. Thomas. "TCI, News Corp. buy Reiss; Tele-Communications Inc. and News Corporation Ltd. buy interest in Reiss Media Enterprises Inc.", Multichannel News, April 6, 1992. Retrieved March 2, 2011 from HighBeam Research.
  3. ^ End of Request TV announced
  4. ^ Gonzalez, Erika. "Pay-Per-View Service Closing; TCI Decides Not to Extend Contract of Request Television", Rocky Mountain News, April 22, 1998. Retrieved March 2, 2011 from HighBeam Research.

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