Residential community

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A residential community is a community, usually a small town or city, that is composed mostly of residents, as opposed to commercial businesses and/or industrial facilities, all three of which are considered to be the three main types of occupants of the typical community.

Residential communities are typically communities that help support more commercial or industrial communities with consumers and workers; this phenomenon is probably because some people prefer not to live in an urban or industrial area, but rather a suburban or rural setting. For this reason, they are also called dormitory towns, bedroom communities, or commuter towns.

An example of a residential community would include a small town or city located a number of miles outside of a larger city, or a large town located near a smaller, yet more commercially or industrially centered, town or city.

China[edit]

In the mainland of the People's Republic of China, a community (simplified Chinese: 社区; traditional Chinese: 社區; pinyin: shèqū), also called residential unit or residential quarter (simplified Chinese: 小区; traditional Chinese: 小區; pinyin: xiǎoqū) or neighbourhood (simplified Chinese: 居民区; traditional Chinese: 居民區; pinyin: jūmínqū) or residential community (simplified Chinese: 居住区; traditional Chinese: 居住區; pinyin: jūzhùqū), is an urban residential area and its residents administrated by a subdistrict (simplified Chinese: 街道办事处; traditional Chinese: 街道辦事處; pinyin: jiēdàobànshìchù). Every community has a community committee, neighborhood committee or residents' committee (simplified Chinese: 社区居民委员会; traditional Chinese: 社區居民委員會; pinyin: shèqūjūmínwěiyuánhuì) and every committee administers the dwellers living in that community.

See also[edit]