Nonin Chowaney

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Rev. Nonin Chowaney
Nonin Chowaney.JPG
Religion Sōtō
Personal
Nationality American
Senior posting
Based in Nebraska Zen Center
Title Roshi
Predecessor Dainin Katagiri
Religious career
Website www.prairiewindzen.org/

Rev. Nonin Chowaney (OPW) is an American Soto Zen priest, brush calligrapher, and the current abbot and head priest of the Nebraska Zen Center at the Heartland Temple in Omaha, Nebraska.[1][2] A Dharma heir of the late Dainin Katagiri-roshi,[3][4] Chowaney received Dharma transmission in 1989 and is the founder of an organization of Soto priests known as The Order of the Prairie Wind (OPW).[5] Chowaney also established an affiliate practice place called Tending the Ox Zendo in Raymond, Nebraska, and The White Lotus Sangha, which consisits of three affiliated prison groups in Nebraska. Having studied Zen in Japan as well as at Tassajara Zen Mountain Center, Chowaney is certified by the Soto School of Japan and participates on the Membership Committee of the American Zen Teachers Association.

In 1999, Chowaney founded the Zen Center of Pittsburgh - Deep Spring Temple in Bell Acres, Pennsylvania and appointed Rev. Kyōki Roberts as the head priest. Then in 2001 he gave Dharma transmission to Roberts, his senior ordained student.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fussell, James A. (2006-08-01). "It's summer, it's hot, so deal with it 'Accepting' the heat makes more sense than trying to fight it, an environmental educator says". Kansas City Star. Retrieved 2008-03-20. 
  2. ^ Chadwick, David (1994). Thank you and OK! An American Zen Failure in Japan. Arkana. ISBN 0-14-019457-6. 
  3. ^ Ford, James Ishmael (2006). Zen Master Who?: A Guide to the People and Stories of Zen. Wisdom Publications. p. 135. ISBN 0-86171-509-8. 
  4. ^ "Nonin Chowaney Interview". Sweeping Zen. 2011-04-13. Retrieved 2011-05-04. 
  5. ^ "Nonin Chowaney". Sweeping Zen. Retrieved April 1, 2015. 
  6. ^ "Head Priest". Zen Center of Pittsburgh. Retrieved April 1, 2015. 

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