Revelstoke, British Columbia

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Revelstoke
City
City of Revelstoke
MacKenzie Avenue
MacKenzie Avenue
Nickname(s): Revy, The Stoke, Revelstuck
Motto: Work Hard, Play Hard
Revelstoke is located in British Columbia
Revelstoke
Revelstoke
Location of Revelstoke in British Columbia
Coordinates: 50°59′53″N 118°11′44″W / 50.99806°N 118.19556°W / 50.99806; -118.19556Coordinates: 50°59′53″N 118°11′44″W / 50.99806°N 118.19556°W / 50.99806; -118.19556
Country  Canada
Province  British Columbia
Regional District Columbia-Shuswap
Founded 1880
Incorporated 1899
Government
 • Mayor Mark McKee
 • Governing Body Revelstoke City Council
Area
 • City 40.76 km2 (15.74 sq mi)
Elevation 480 m (1,570 ft)
Population (2011)
 • City 7,139
 • Density 175.1/km2 (454/sq mi)
 • Urban 6,772[1]
Time zone Pacific Time Zone (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) Pacific Daylight Time (UTC-7)
Postal code span V0E
Area code(s) +1-250
Website City of Revelstoke.com

Revelstoke (/ˈrɛvəlstk/; 2011 population: 7,139) (Kutenai: ktunwa·kanmituk_mi¢̕qaqas[2] ), (Shuswap: Sts'gil'xtn[3] ) is a city in southeastern British Columbia, Canada. It is located 641 kilometers (398 mi) east of Vancouver, and 415 kilometers (258 mi) west of Calgary, Alberta. The city is situated on the banks of the Columbia River just south of the Revelstoke Dam and near its confluence with the Illecillewaet River. East of Revelstoke are the Selkirk Mountains and Glacier National Park, penetrated by Rogers Pass used by the Trans-Canada Highway and the Canadian Pacific Railway. South of the community down the Columbia River are the Arrow Lakes and the Kootenays. West of the city is Eagle Pass through the Monashee Mountains and the route to Shuswap Lake.

History[edit]

Railway station, 1915
Revelstoke Railway Museum

Revelstoke was founded in the 1880s when the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) was built through the area; mining was an important early industry. The name was originally Farwell, after a local land owner and surveyor. In yet earlier days, the spot was called the Second Crossing, to differentiate it from the first crossing of the Columbia River by the Canadian Pacific Railway at Donald. The city was named by the Canadian Pacific Railway in appreciation of Lord Revelstoke, head of Baring Brothers & Co., the UK investment bank that, in partnership with Glyn, Mills & Co., saved the Canadian Pacific Railway from bankruptcy in the summer of 1885 by buying the company's unsold bonds, enabling the railway to reach completion.

The construction of the Trans-Canada Highway in 1962 further eased access to the region, and since then tourism has been an important feature of the local economy, with skiing having emerged as the most prominent attraction. Mount Revelstoke National Park is just north of the town. The construction of Revelstoke Mountain Resort, a major new ski resort on Mount MacKenzie, just outside of town, has been underway since late 2005, and first opened during the 2007-2008 ski season. Revelstoke is also the site of a railway museum.

It is also the site and namesake of the 1965 impact of a meteorite,[4] which, though resulting in only a few small pieces that could be found, made a splendorous fireball track across the sky. This meteorite was a carbonaceous chondrite, an especially primitive and friable type. That fact, plus the rather flat trajectory (allowing a long air path) accounts for the paucity of surviving fragments - most of the meteorite vaporized, burnt up, or broke into dust.

Revelstoke holds the Canadian record for snowiest single winter. 2447 cm of snow fell on Mt.Copeland outside town during the winter of 1971-72. That works out to just over 80 feet of snow. The townsite received 779 cm and snow levels were higher than many roofs around town by more than a few metres.[5]

Economy[edit]

Revelstoke's economy has traditionally been tied to the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) and it still maintains a strong connection to that industry. However, mining, forestry, government services and tourism now play an increasingly important role in Revelstoke's success. The city is served by Revelstoke Airport.

Revelstoke is also the location of the Revelstoke Dam which was constructed on the Columbia River, and completed in 1984. In 1986, to offset the economic effects of the completed hydroelectric project and the temporary closure of the local sawmill, the City of Revelstoke undertook a downtown revitalization program and it was completed with marked success.

A small ski resort featuring a single short lift has operated on Mount MacKenzie since the 1960s, and snowcat skiing was offered for higher altitudes. A strong movement pushed to expand the entire mountain into a single resort, and construction started in the early 2000s (decade).

Revelstoke Mountain Resort opened in the winter of 2007/8 and boasts North America's greatest vertical at 1,713 metres (5,620 ft).

The resort also offers 3,121 acres of fall line skiing, high alpine bowls, 13 areas of gladed terrain and more groomed terrain. Revelstoke Mountain Resort is also the only resort world-wide to offer lift, cat, heli and backcountry skiing from one village base. The resort will continue development, though economic conditions starting in late 2008 have deferred its initial plans.

Sports[edit]

Revelstoke has produced some talented athletes in winter sports, notably ice hockey.

The former local BCJHL team, the Revelstoke Bruins, had a number of future NHLers on its roster in the 1970s and 1980s, including Bruce Holloway, Ron E. Flockhart, and Rudy Poesc. The current Revelstoke Kootenay International Junior Hockey League team is the Revelstoke Grizzlies.

Norwegian immigrants brought the skiing and ski jumping to Revelstoke, and by the 1910s, several ski jumping hills had been built around town. Revelstoke Ski Club was founded in 1914, and by the following year had reached 102 members. The pinnacle of the club was the annual Winter Carnival Tournament. The first tournament was held in 1915, and had, in addition to cross-country skiing competitions, ski jumping competitions for boys under 16 and the title of Champion of British Columbia. Nels Nelsen Hill, first known as Big Hill, opened in 1916. Revelstoke became an international center for ski jumping, attracting the world elite for the annual tournament.[6] Revelstoke's own Nels Nelsen set the world records in the hill, at 73 meters (240 ft) in 1925 and 82 meters (269 ft) set by Bob Lymburne in 1932.[7] The hill was completely renovated by 1948, leading to further international tournaments. The town even considered placing a bid for the 1968 Winter Olympics. However, throughout the 1960s, the interest for ski jumping was declining, with subsequent consequences for the number of spectators. The last tournament was held in 1975.[8]

Revelstoke Freeride World Tour

Due to the heavy snowfall in the area, Revelstoke is home to four heli-skiing and two cat-skiing operations. There are numerous backcountry skiing lodges in the area. Revelstoke is also a major snowmobiling destination.

In the summer, mountain biking, rock climbing and kayaking are popular activities.

In 2010, Revelstoke became part of a select group of ski resorts to feature the Freskiing World Tour. After a successful trial of combining European and North American skiing tours starting with Revelstoke in 2012, the Swatch Freeride World Tour, Freeskiing World Tour and The North Face Masters of Snowboarding announced a merger that combined all three tours under one unified global 5-star championship series. The six-stop world tour named the Swatch Freeride World Tour by the North Face includes freeride skiing and snowboarding at each stop starting with Revelstoke, Canada and ending with Verbier, Switzerland.

In 2011, Revelstoke locals Michael Curran and Stephanie Ells formed Revelstoke Roller Derby Association. The league provides the only affordable, year round team sport option for adult women in town. The leagues premier team, the Derailers, held its debut bouts in the summer of 2012 and won both home games.

Club League Sport Venue Established Championships
Revelstoke Grizzlies KIJHL Ice Hockey Revelstoke Forum 1993 4

Films[edit]

Some scenes in the 1999 thriller Double Jeopardy starring Ashley Judd and Tommy Lee Jones were filmed in Revelstoke, notably the historic courthouse.

The 1937 British movie The Great Barrier starring Lilli Palmer depicted the building of the Canadian Pacific Railway and featured location shooting from Revelstoke.

The Barber (2001) starring Malcolm McDowell was almost entirely filmed in Revelstoke and features the town name displaced as Revelstoke, Alaska.

Climate[edit]

Climate data for Revelstoke
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high Humidex 9.8 8.8 16.7 26.8 36.9 37.6 40.9 38.3 31.9 22.5 16.9 6.7 40.9
Record high °C (°F) 11.7
(53.1)
10.6
(51.1)
18.8
(65.8)
27.2
(81)
35.7
(96.3)
37.2
(99)
37.2
(99)
36.1
(97)
31.1
(88)
22.5
(72.5)
17.2
(63)
7.8
(46)
37.2
(99)
Average high °C (°F) −0.9
(30.4)
1.1
(34)
7.2
(45)
13.6
(56.5)
19.7
(67.5)
22.9
(73.2)
25.1
(77.2)
24.5
(76.1)
18.4
(65.1)
10.6
(51.1)
3.3
(37.9)
−1.3
(29.7)
12
(54)
Daily mean °C (°F) −3.5
(25.7)
−2.2
(28)
2.5
(36.5)
7.8
(46)
12.9
(55.2)
16.4
(61.5)
18.3
(64.9)
17.9
(64.2)
12.7
(54.9)
6.8
(44.2)
1
(34)
−3.6
(25.5)
7.3
(45.1)
Average low °C (°F) −6.2
(20.8)
−5.5
(22.1)
−2.3
(27.9)
1.9
(35.4)
6.1
(43)
9.9
(49.8)
11.5
(52.7)
11.3
(52.3)
7
(45)
3
(37)
−1.3
(29.7)
−6
(21)
2.5
(36.5)
Record low °C (°F) −29.4
(−20.9)
−25.6
(−14.1)
−20.6
(−5.1)
−9.4
(15.1)
−2.5
(27.5)
0.6
(33.1)
3.9
(39)
2.2
(36)
−2.2
(28)
−12.7
(9.1)
−23.6
(−10.5)
−27.2
(−17)
−29.4
(−20.9)
Wind chill −35.3 −34.4 −28.7 −14.3 −2.6 0 0 0 −6 −19.8 −36.6 −34.8 −36.6
Precipitation mm (inches) 107.9
(4.248)
80.4
(3.165)
61.6
(2.425)
66.5
(2.618)
58.1
(2.287)
75.2
(2.961)
72.5
(2.854)
66.6
(2.622)
55.5
(2.185)
84.2
(3.315)
118.3
(4.657)
103.7
(4.083)
950.5
(37.421)
Rainfall mm (inches) 20.8
(0.819)
27.7
(1.091)
43.7
(1.72)
62.2
(2.449)
58.1
(2.287)
75.2
(2.961)
72.5
(2.854)
66.6
(2.622)
55.5
(2.185)
82.5
(3.248)
62.3
(2.453)
22.3
(0.878)
649.3
(25.563)
Snowfall cm (inches) 112.5
(44.29)
67.9
(26.73)
21.5
(8.46)
4.3
(1.69)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
1.7
(0.67)
62.4
(24.57)
110.6
(43.54)
381
(150)
Avg. precipitation days (≥ 0.2 mm) 19 15.5 14.5 16.1 14.1 16.1 14.9 13.2 11.2 15.1 20.6 17.9 188.2
Avg. rainy days (≥ 0.2 mm) 5.9 7.3 12.3 15.8 14.1 16.1 14.9 13.2 11.2 14.9 13.9 5.1 144.8
Avg. snowy days (≥ 0.2 cm) 16.9 11.1 4.5 1.4 0 0 0 0 0 0.6 10.7 16.7 62.1
 % humidity 82.4 76.7 63.3 49.3 44.8 46.8 50.8 53.1 59.1 70.6 82.2 82.3 63.5
Mean monthly sunshine hours 29.6 57.8 125.1 157.6 209 213.4 241.6 233.7 168.6 88.4 32.9 25.1 1,582.7
Percent possible sunshine 11.3 20.6 34 38.1 43.5 43.3 48.6 51.8 44.3 26.5 12.2 10.1 32
Source: [9]

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and population centres, 2011 and 2006 censuses: British Columbia. Statistics Canada. Retrieved March 17, 2013
  2. ^ "FirstVoices: Nature / Environment - place names: words. Ktunaxa.". Retrieved 2012-07-07. 
  3. ^ "Secwepemc Historical Sites". Secwepemculecw, Land of the Shuswap. Retrieved 2012-09-06. 
  4. ^ http://www.geo.ucalgary.ca/cdnmeteorites/meteorite/revelstoke.html
  5. ^ Ross, Oakland (25 October 2009). "The worst places in Canada for winter". The Star (Toronto). 
  6. ^ Revelstoke Museum and Archives. "Early days of skiing in Revelstoke: 1890-1915". Virtual Museum. Archived from the original on 14 February 2011. Retrieved 14 February 2011. 
  7. ^ Thoresen, Arne (2007). Lenst gjennom lufta (in Norwegian). Oslo: Versal. p. 372. ISBN 978-82-8188-030-6. 
  8. ^ Revelstoke Museum and Archives. "Re-opening of the Nels Nelsen Hill and the Tournament of Champions". Virtual Museum. Archived from the original on 14 February 2011. Retrieved 14 February 2011. 
  9. ^ "Calculation Information for 1981 to 2010 Canadian Normals Data". Environment Canada. Retrieved July 9, 2013. 

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]