Ribes divaricatum

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Ribes divaricatum
Ribes divaricatum 5383.JPG
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Core eudicots
Order: Saxifragales
Family: Grossulariaceae
Genus: Ribes
Species: R. divaricatum
Binomial name
Ribes divaricatum
Douglas [1]
Varieties

 List sources : [2][3]

Synonyms[1][2][4][5][6][7][8][9][10]
  • R. d. var. douglasii Jancz.
    [ = R. divaricatum ]
  • R. d. var. glabriflorum Koehne in Koehne
    [ = R. divaricatum ]
  • R. d. var. rigidum M.Peck
    [ = R. divaricatum ]
  • Grossularia divaricata Coville & Britton
    [ = R. divaricatum ]
  • R. parishii A.Heller
    [ = var. parishii ]
  • R. d. ssp. parishii (A.Heller) A.E.Murray
    [ = var. parishii ]
  • R. d. var. montanum Jancz.
    [ = var. pubiflorum ]

Ribes divaricatum is a species of currant with three accepted varieties, and known by several common names, found in the forests, woodlands, and coastal scrub of western North America from British Columbia to California.

Varieties[edit]

  • The type variety (and autonym), R. d. var. divaricatum, or spreading gooseberry is found in Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia.[11]
  • R. d. var. parishii, called Parish's gooseberry, is found only in California.[12][13]
  • R. d. var. pubiflorum, known as straggly gooseberry is native to both California and Oregon.[14][15]

Other common names include coast black gooseberry, and wild gooseberry.[16]

Flower distinguishing features include a red to reddish-green calyx with recurved lobes, white to red petals and stamens that are longer than the calyx lobes.

Description[edit]

R. divaricatum is a shrub sometimes reaching 3 meters in height with woody branches with one to three thick brown thorns at leaf nodes. The leaves are generally palmate in shape and edged with teeth. The blades are up to 6 centimeters long and borne on petioles.

The inflorescence is a small cluster of hanging flowers, each with reflexed purple-tinted green sepals and smaller, lighter petals encircling long, protruding stamens. The fruit is a berry up to a centimeter wide which is black when ripe. It is similar to Ribes lacustre and Ribes lobbii, but the former has smaller, reddish to maroon flowers and the latter has reddish flowers that resemble those of fuchsias and sticky leaves.

Traditional Native American medical plants[edit]

The fruit was food for a number of Native American groups of the Pacific Northwest, and other parts of the plant, especially the bark, was used for medicinal purposes.[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b  The original description of this species was published in Transactions, of the Horticultural Society of London, 7: 515. 1830. "Plant Name Details for Ribes divaricatum". IPNI. Retrieved August 2, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b USDA PLANTS, name search: Ribes divaricatum
  3. ^ "Profile for Ribes divaricatum (spreading gooseberry)". PLANTS Database. USDA, NRCS. Retrieved August 2, 2010. 
  4. ^  Ribes divaricatum var. douglasii was published in Mémoires de la Société de Physique et d'Histoire Naturelle de Genève. 35: 391. 1907. Geneva & Paris. "Plant Name Details for Ribes divaricatum var. douglasii". IPNI. Retrieved August 2, 2010. 
  5. ^  Grossularia divaricata was published in North American Flora xxii. 224 (1908). New York Botanical Garden. "Plant Name Details for Grossularia divaricata". IPNI. Retrieved August 2, 2010. 
  6. ^  R. d. var. glabriflorum was published in Deutsche Dendrologie. 200. 1893. "Plant Name Details for Ribes divaricatum var. glabriflorum". IPNI. Retrieved August 2, 2010. 
  7. ^  R. d. var. rigidum was published in Leaflets of Western Botany 7: 182. 1954. San Francisco, California. "Plant Name Details for Ribes divaricatum var. rigidum". IPNI. Retrieved August 2, 2010. 
  8. ^  R. parishii was published in Muhlenbergia; a Journal of Botany. 1: 134. 1904. Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and Los Gatos, California. "Plant Name Details for Ribes parishii". IPNI. Retrieved August 2, 2010. 
  9. ^  R. d. ssp. parishii was published in Kalmia; Botanic Journal. 12: 24 (1982). Levittown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania "Plant Name Details for Ribes divaricatum ssp. parishii". IPNI. Retrieved August 2, 2010. 
  10. ^  R. d. var. montanum was published in Mémoires de la Société de Physique et d'Histoire Naturelle de Genève. 35: 391. 1907. Geneva & Paris. "Plant Name Details for Ribes divaricatum var. montanum". IPNI. Retrieved August 2, 2010. 
  11. ^ "Profile for Ribes divaricatum var. divaricatum (spreading gooseberry)". PLANTS Database. USDA, NRCS. Retrieved August 2, 2010. 
  12. ^ "Profile for Ribes divaricatum var. parishii (Parish's gooseberry)". PLANTS Database. USDA, NRCS. Retrieved August 2, 2010. 
  13. ^  R. d. var. parishii was published in A Flora of California. 2: 151. 1936. Berkeley, London, San Francisco. "Plant Name Details for Ribes divaricatum var. parishii". IPNI. Retrieved August 2, 2010. 
  14. ^ "Profile for Ribes divaricatum var. pubiflorum (straggly gooseberry)". PLANTS Database. USDA, NRCS. Retrieved August 2, 2010. 
  15. ^  R. d. var. pubiflorum was published in Deutsche Dendrologie. 200. 1893. "Plant Name Details for Ribes divaricatum var. pubiflorum". IPNI. Retrieved August 2, 2010. 
  16. ^ "USDA GRIN Taxonomy". 
  17. ^ Dan Moerman. "Search for Ribes divaricatum". Native American Ethnobotany Database. Dearborn, Michigan: University of Michigan. Retrieved August 2, 2010. 

External links[edit]