Ricardo McDonald

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Ricardo McDonald
No. 56,54,57
Linebacker
Personal information
Date of birth: (1969-11-08) November 8, 1969 (age 44)
Place of birth: Kingston, Jamaica
Career information
College: Pittsburgh
NFL Draft: 1992 / Round: 4 / Pick: 88
Debuted in 1992
Last played in 2001
Career history
Career NFL statistics
Sacks 15
Interceptions 1
Games played 119
Stats at NFL.com

Ricardo McDonald (born November 8, 1969) is a former linebacker in the National Football League that played for the Cincinnati Bengals, Chicago Bears, and the Denver Broncos. He played college football for the University of Pittsburgh.

His twin brother Devon McDonald played linebacker for the Indianapolis Colts and the Arizona Cardinals.

He played for Eastside High School in Paterson, New Jersey under Coach Barrett 'Barry' Rosser. Joe Louis Clark was the school's Principal during his attendance there, as depicted in the film Lean on Me.[1]

McDonald has said he suffered at least 20 concussions, and played one game the same week his physician said his brain was 60 percent swollen and he suffered another concussion on top of that. After an MRI, McDonald was told his brain was like that of an 80 year old. He also suffers from memory loss and headaches.[2] [3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Idec, Keith. "Where are they now? Eastside's Ricardo McDonald", The Record (Bergen County), March 7, 2011. Accessed May 5, 2012. "While many of them suffer from debilitating physical ailments, financial difficulties and marital problems that often lead to divorce in their post-NFL lives, McDonald is in good physical condition, is a happily married father of four and is part-owner of a thriving truck stop 90 minutes outside of Pittsburgh, where the ex-Eastside star was a collegiate standout for the Panthers.... He and his twin brother, former Kennedy star and NFL linebacker Devon McDonald, were among the best high school football players in North Jersey during the 1980s. They also experienced personal tragedy that made them want to provide positive examples to Paterson’s youth."
  2. ^ "Retired NFL Players and Dementia: Brain Trauma Hits Hard After Football Career". December 4, 2011. Retrieved November 25, 2013. 
  3. ^ "John Mackey and other retired NFL players experience living hell". July 7, 2011. Retrieved November 25, 2013.