Rich Chernomaz

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Rich Chernomaz
Born (1963-09-01) September 1, 1963 (age 50)
Selkirk, MB, CAN
Height 5 ft 8 in (173 cm)
Weight 185 lb (84 kg; 13 st 3 lb)
Position Right Wing
Played for Colorado Rockies
New Jersey Devils
Calgary Flames
Schwenningen Wild Wings
National team  Canada
NHL Draft 26th overall, 1981
Colorado Rockies
Playing career 1981–1999

Richard Chernomaz (born September 1, 1963 in Selkirk, Manitoba and raised in Port Alberni, British Columbia) is a Canadian former ice hockey right winger and head coach in Europe. He played 51 National Hockey League (NHL) games for the Colorado Rockies, New Jersey Devils and Calgary Flames. Chernomaz' career was spent primarily in the minor leagues where he was a two-time International Hockey League (IHL) all-star, and in 1993–94, won the Les Cunningham Award as the most valuable player of the American Hockey League (AHL). Chernomaz participated in the 1995 World Championship in Austria where he was a member of Team Canada's bronze medal-winning squad. Chernomaz remained in Europe following the tournament and played his final four seasons with the Schwenninger Wild Wings of the Deutsche Eishockey Liga (DEL). He moved to coaching in 1999, spending time with several DEL teams and winning two German championships. He coached the Hungarian national team at the 2013 World Championship.

Playing career[edit]

Chernomaz played four seasons of junior hockey in the Western Hockey League (WHL) for the Saskatoon Blades and Victoria Cougars between 1979 and 1983.[1] He scored 113 points in 1980–81 for the Cougars in the regular season.[2] Chernomaz added 26 more in 15 playoff games, the fifth best total in the WHL, as Victoria defeated the Calgary Wranglers in the league championship final to win the President's Cup.[2] The Colorado Rockies selected him with their second round selection, 26th overall, at the 1981 NHL Entry Draft, and he made his NHL debut in 1981–82, appearing in two games during a brief recall from Victoria.[1] His NHL debut came on November 11, 1981, against the Montreal Canadiens.[3] Chernomaz' best WHL season came in 1982–83 when he recorded 124 points in 64 games and was named a league all-star.[4]

The Rockies relocated east to become the New Jersey Devils in 1982, and Chernomaz transferred with the team. He appeared in seven games with the Devils in 1983–84 and scored his first two NHL goals. He spent most of the season with the Devils American Hockey League (AHL) affiliate, the Maine Mariners, where he recorded 46 points in 69 games.[2] He appeared in only two playoff games for the Mariners, but was a member of the team as they won the Calder Cup.[5] Chernomaz spent the majority of the following three seasons in the AHL, but he did appear in 25 NHL games with the Devils in 1986–87 and scored six goals to go with four assists.[1]

Allowed to go to free agency, Chernomaz was signed by the Calgary Flames in 1987.[2] He was a member of the Flames organization for seven seasons, but made only sporadic appearances with Calgary and appeared in 11 games over that span, the last of which came in the 1991–92 NHL season.[1] He played with Calgary's International Hockey League (IHL) affiliate, the Salt Lake Golden Eagles, where he was a member of the team's Turner Cup championship squad in 1987–88,[6] and was named to the second all-star team in both 1987–88 and 1990–91.[2]

Chernomaz joined the Toronto Maple Leafs organization in 1992 where he played two AHL seasons with the St. John's Maple Leafs.[1] In his first, 1993–94, he scored 45 goals and 110 points that season, was named to the AHL First All-Star Team and won the Les Cunningham Award as the league's most valuable player.[2] He served as a playing assistant coach in 1994–95.[7] At the same time, he played two seasons in Roller Hockey International, recording 33 points in 13 games for the Utah Rollerbees in 1993 and 54 points in 17 games with the Las Vegas Flash in 1994.[2]

Chernomaz made his lone international appearance at the 1995 World Championship in Austria. He recorded three assists in eight games for Team Canada, which won the bronze medal.[8] Choosing to remain in Europe, he signed with the Schwenninger Wild Wings of the Deutsche Eishockey Liga (DEL).[7] Chernomaz played his final four seasons with the Wild Wings before retiring in 1999.[1]

Schwenninger hired Chernomaz as the team's coach following his playing career.[7] He spent two seasons behind the Wild Wings' bench before moving on to coach several other DEL teams: Kölner Haie, with whom he won the German championship in 2001–02, Augsburger Panther, the Frankfurt Lions where a second German title followed in 2003–04 and then ERC Ingolstadt, whom he coached into the 2012–13 season.[9] He was hired to coach the Hungarian national team in 2013,[9] and led the team to a bronze medal at the 2013 IIHF World Championship Division I.[10]

Chernomaz is a part owner of he Alberni Valley Bulldogs, a junior team in the British Columbia Hockey League that he bought a share of in 2003.[3]

Career statistics[edit]

Regular season and playoffs[edit]

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1979–80 Saskatoon Olympics SJHL 51 33 37 70 75
1979–80 Saskatoon Blades WHL 25 9 10 19 33
1980–81 Victoria Cougars WHL 72 49 64 113 92 15 11 15 26 38
1981–82 Victoria Cougars WHL 49 36 62 98 69 4 1 2 3 13
1981–82 Colorado Rockies NHL 2 0 0 0 0
1982–83 Victoria Cougars WHL 64 71 53 124 113 12 10 5 15 18
1983–84 New Jersey Devils NHL 7 2 1 3 2
1983–84 Maine Mariners AHL 69 17 29 46 39 2 0 1 1 0
1984–85 New Jersey Devils NHL 3 0 2 2 2
1984–85 Maine Mariners AHL 64 17 34 51 64 10 2 2 4 4
1985–86 Maine Mariners AHL 78 21 28 49 82 5 0 0 0 2
1986–87 New Jersey Devils NHL 25 6 4 10 8
1986–87 Maine Mariners AHL 58 35 27 62 65
1987–88 Calgary Flames NHL 2 1 0 1 0
1987–88 Salt Lake Golden Eagles IHL 73 48 47 95 122 18 4 14 18 30
1988–89 Calgary Flames NHL 1 0 0 0 0
1988–89 Salt Lake Golden Eagles IHL 81 33 68 101 122 14 7 5 12 47
1989–90 Salt Lake Golden Eagles IHL 65 39 35 74 170 11 6 6 12 32
1990–91 Salt Lake Golden Eagles IHL 81 39 58 97 213 4 3 1 4 8
1991–92 Calgary Flames NHL 11 0 0 0 6
1991–92 Salt Lake Golden Eagles IHL 66 20 50 60 201 5 1 2 3 10
1992–93 Salt Lake Golden Eagles IHL 76 26 48 74 172
1993–93 St. John's Maple Leafs AHL 78 45 65 110 199 11 5 11 16 18
1994–95 St. John's Maple Leafs AHL 77 24 45 69 235 5 1 1 2 8
1995–96 Schwenninger Wild Wings DEL 49 24 43 67 105 2 1 1 2 24
1996–97 Schwenninger Wild Wings DEL 47 25 39 64 126 5 3 5 8 8
1997–98 Schwenninger Wild Wings DEL 51 12 37 49 156
1998–99 Schwenninger Wild Wings DEL 43 9 38 47 177
NHL totals 51 9 7 16 18

International[edit]

Year Team Event GP G A Pts PIM
1995 Canada WC 8 0 3 3 10

Awards and honours[edit]

Medal record
Men's ice hockey
Competitor for Canada Canada
World Championships
Bronze 1995 Sweden
Career
Award Year Ref.
WHL All-Star Team 1982–83 [11]
IHL Second All-Star Team 1987–88
1990–91
[2]
AHL First All-Star Team 1993–94 [2]
Les Cunningham Award
AHL Most Valuable Player
1993–94 [2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Richard Chernomaz player card". National Hockey League. Retrieved 2013-12-11. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Rich Chernomaz biography". Hockey Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2013-12-09. 
  3. ^ a b "1981 NHL draft pick – Rich Chernomaz". Hockey Draft Central. Retrieved 2013-12-11. 
  4. ^ "Derkatch leads all-stars". Regina Leader-Post. 1983-04-08. p. B1. Retrieved 2013-12-11. 
  5. ^ "Calder Cup champions: the players". American Hockey League. Retrieved 2013-12-11. 
  6. ^ "Eagles return triumphant to cheering crowd; Salt Lake brings home IGL's Turner Cup again". Deseret News. 1988-05-24. Retrieved 2013-12-11.  – via Newsbank (subscription required)
  7. ^ a b c Podnieks, Andrew (2003). Players: The ultimate A–Z guide of everyone who has ever played in the NHL. Toronto: Doubleday Canada. p. 137. ISBN 0-385-25999-9. 
  8. ^ Podnieks, Andrew, ed. (2011). IIHF Guide & Record Book 2012. International Ice Hockey Federation. p. 462. ISBN 978-0-7710-9598-6. 
  9. ^ a b "Chernomaz to coach Hungary team prepares for World Championship Division I on home ice". States News Service. 2013-02-05. Retrieved 2013-02-05.  – via Highbeam (subscription required)
  10. ^ "Kazakhs come back". International Ice Hockey Federation. 2013-04-20. Retrieved 2013-12-11. 
  11. ^ Flett, Cory; Watts, Jesse, eds. (2009). 2009–10 WHL Guide. Western Hockey League. p. 204. 

External links[edit]