Rich Gossweiler

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Rich Gossweiler
Residence Sunnyvale, California, United States
Citizenship American
Fields Human-computer interaction
Social computing
Institutions PARC
IBM Almaden Research Center
NASA Ames
Hewlett-Packard
Google
Alma mater University of Virginia
Thesis Perception-Based Time Critical Rendering (1996)
Doctoral advisor Randy Pausch[1]
Website
www.richgossweiler.com

Rich Gossweiler is a research scientist with Google whose area of expertise is in system and interaction design.

Education[edit]

Gossweiler graduated from the College of William and Mary, majoring in Computer Science and minoring in mathematics.[2] He received both his Masters Degree and Ph.D. from the University of Virginia, focusing on perceptual psychology and computer science in relation to 3D graphics.[3] He was Randy Pausch's first Ph.D. student.[4]

Career[edit]

Gossweiler is currently researching new search models, user experiences and collaborative applications for Google.[5][6][7] He has worked at Hewlett-Packard,[8] IBM Almaden Research Center, Xerox PARC and NASA where he worked at NASA Ames participating in the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Mathematics Genealogy Project - Richard Gossweiler". North Dakota State University. Retrieved January 31, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Rich Gossweiler's Biography Page". Official website. Retrieved January 31, 2013. 
  3. ^ Wilhelm, Sherie A. (Apr 19, 1994). "Virtual reality: now you live it, now you don't". The Cavalier Daily (Google News). p. 5. Retrieved January 31, 2013. 
  4. ^ McCurley, Kevin (July 26, 2008). "Research Blog: Remembering Randy Pausch". Google Research. Retrieved January 31, 2013. 
  5. ^ Goodin, Dan (April 20, 2009). "Google boffins unveil 'What's Up?' CAPTCHA". The Register. Retrieved January 31, 2013. 
  6. ^ Eisenberg, Anne (May 3, 2009). "New Puzzles That Tell Humans From Machines". The New York Times. Retrieved January 31, 2013. 
  7. ^ Abell, John C (April 17, 2009). "Google Goes Captcha One Better". Wired. Retrieved January 31, 2013. 
  8. ^ "Wired 11.08: The Super Power IssueBeing Invisible". Wired.com. Retrieved January 31, 2013. 

External links[edit]