Richard A. Harrison

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Richard Almgill Harrison
Richard Almgill Harrison.png
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Ohio's 7th district
In office
July 4, 1861 – March 3, 1863
Preceded by Thomas Corwin
Succeeded by Samuel S. Cox
Member of the Ohio House of Representatives
from the Madison County district
In office
January 4, 1858 – January 1, 1860
Preceded by E. E. Hutchison
Succeeded by Robert Hutcheson
Member of the Ohio Senate
from the 11th district
In office
January 2, 1860 – July 3, 1861
Preceded by Samuel S. Henkle
Succeeded by Samson Mason
Personal details
Born (1824-04-08)April 8, 1824
Thirsk, England
Died July 30, 1904(1904-07-30) (aged 80)
Columbus, Ohio
Resting place Kirkwood Cemetery, London, Ohio
Political party Unionist
Spouse(s) Maria Louisa Warner
Children seven
Alma mater Cincinnati Law School
Signature

Richard Almgill Harrison (April 8, 1824 – July 30, 1904) was a nineteenth-century politician and lawyer from Ohio.

Born in Thirsk, England, Harrison immigrated to the United States with his parents in 1832, settling in Ohio. He attended public schools, graduated from the Cincinnati Law School in 1846 and was admitted to the bar the same year, commencing practice in London, Ohio. He was a member of the Ohio House of Representatives in 1858 and 1859 and was a member of the Ohio Senate in 1860 and 1861. Harrison was elected a Unionist to the United States House of Representatives to fill a vacancy in 1861, serving from 1861 to 1863. Afterward, he continued practicing law in Columbus, Ohio until his death there on July 30, 1904. He was interred in Kirkwood Cemetery in London, Ohio.

On December 21, 1847, Harrison was married at London, Ohio to Maria Louisa Warner, and had three daughters and four sons.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Reed, George Irving; Randall, Emilius Oviatt; Greve, Charles Theodore, eds. (1897). Bench and Bar of Ohio: a Compendium of History and Biography 1. Chicago: Century Publishing and Engraving Company. pp. 98–109. 

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