Richard Austin (punchcutter)

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For other people named Richard Austin, see Richard Austin (disambiguation).

Richard Austin (c. 1765–1830) was an English punchcutter. He was the original cutter of typefaces Bell, Scotch Roman, and Porson.[1] Born in London, he studied wood engraving under Thomas Bewick before joining John Bell's British Letter Foundry in 1788 as a punch-cutter, where he worked until the foundry closed in 1798. He then worked for William Miller's foundry in Edinburgh before founded his own Imperial Letter Foundry in London. Stanley Morison calls his Bell the first British example of a Didone or Modern Typeface, though more recent opinion holds that his Scotch Roman was the first truly Modern British face.[2]

Typefaces[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bringhurst, Robert. (2004). The Elements of Typographic Style. Hartley and Marks. p. 333. ISBN 978-0-88179-206-5. 
  2. ^ Macmillsn, Niel.An A-Z of Type Designers. Yale University Press, 2006 (pg. 38–39)
  3. ^ Jaspert, W. Pincus, W. Turner Berry and A.F. Johnson, The Encyclopedia of Type Faces, Blandford Press Lts., 1983 (pg. 14)
  4. ^ Macmillsn, Niel.An A-Z of Type Designers. Yale University Press, 2006 (pg. 38–39)
  5. ^ Macmillsn, Niel.An A-Z of Type Designers. Yale University Press, 2006 (pg. 38–39)
  6. ^ Jaspert, W. Pincus, W. Turner Berry and A.F. Johnson, The Encyclopedia of Type Faces, Blandford Press Lts., 1983 (pg. 203)