Richard Brodeur

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Richard Brodeur
Born (1952-09-15) September 15, 1952 (age 61)
Longueuil, QC, CAN
Height 5 ft 7 in (170 cm)
Weight 185 lb (84 kg; 13 st 3 lb)
Position Goaltender
Played for Quebec Nordiques (WHA)
New York Islanders
Vancouver Canucks
Hartford Whalers
NHL Draft 97th overall, 1972
New York Islanders
Playing career 1972–1988

Richard "King Richard", "Kermit" Brodeur[1] (born September 15, 1952), is a retired Canadian ice hockey goaltender. Brodeur was born in Longueuil, Quebec, but grew up in Montreal, Quebec.

Playing career[edit]

Originally selected in the 1972 NHL Entry Draft by the New York Islanders, Brodeur chose to begin his professional career in the World Hockey Association with the Quebec Nordiques. For seven seasons, he played with the Nordiques, with the 1975–76 season being his best playing 69 games and winning 44. During the 1976–77 season, his goaltending helped guide the Nordiques to the Avco World Trophy.

When the WHA folded following the 1978–79 season, the Islanders reclaimed his rights. However, he only played two games for them as he was the third goalie behind Billy Smith and Chico Resch, and was traded to the Vancouver Canucks prior to the 1980–81 NHL season. In his second season with the Canucks, he guided the team during their improbable playoff run to the finals, eventually losing to Brodeur's old team, the Islanders. Following the Canucks' 6-5 overtime loss in Game 1, Brodeur swatted with his catching mitt at a cameraman who was stationed along the runway between the bench and the dressing room.

Brodeur was selected to play in the 1983 All-Star Game, but couldn't play due to an ear injury suffered in Toronto three days before the game. He remained with the Canucks for almost eight seasons until he was traded near the end of the 1987–88 NHL season to Hartford, where he ended his NHL career.

After his retirement, he founded his own hockey school in the Vancouver area. He also briefly worked as an analyst on Quebec Nordiques French TV telecasts.

He is also remembered for being the goaltender that Wayne Gretzky scored the most on, 29 times in the NHL.[2]

Awards[edit]

  • Terry Sawchuk Award (CHL) - 1979-1980
  • Named to the NHL All-Star Game - 1983
  • Cyclone Taylor Award (Vancouver Canucks) - 1981, 1982, 1985
  • Molson Cup (Most Canucks three-star selections) - 1980–81, 1981–82, 1984–85, 1985–86
  • Inaugural inductee into the World Hockey Association Hall of Fame - 2010[3]

Personal life[edit]

Richard is an artist, using oil on canvas, and has had several shows at Diskin Galleries in Vancouver.[4]

Career statistics[edit]

Regular season[edit]

Season Team League GP W L T MIN GA SO GAA SA SV SV% G A PIM
1970-71 Cornwall Royals QMJHL 35 - - - - 144 0 4.11 - 1254 0.897 0 1 10
1971-72 Cornwall Royals QMJHL 58 - - - - 170 5 2.93 - 1645 0.906 0 1 2
1972-73 Quebec Nordiques WHA 24 5 14 2 1288 102 0 4.75 733 631 0.861 0 0 4
1973-74 Quebec Nordiques WHA 30 15 12 1 1607 89 1 3.32 900 811 0.901 0 1 0
1973-74 Maine Nordiques NAHL 15 - - - 936 47 0 3.01 - - - 0 0 0
1974-75 Quebec Nordiques WHA 51 29 21 0 2938 188 0 3.90 1734 1546 0.892 0 2 13
1975-76 Quebec Nordiques WHA 69 44 21 2 3967 244 2 3.69 2216 1972 0.890 0 3 2
1976-77 Quebec Nordiques WHA 53 29 18 2 2906 167 2 3.45 1396 1229 0.880 0 1 0
1977-78 Quebec Nordiques WHA 36 18 15 2 1962 121 0 3.70 1120 999 0.892 0 2 0
1978-79 Quebec Nordiques WHA 42 25 13 3 2433 126 3 3.11 1279 1153 0.901 0 3 2
1979-80 New York Islanders NHL 2 1 0 0 80 6 0 4.50 - - - 0 0 0
1980-81 Vancouver Canucks NHL 52 17 18 16 3024 177 0 3.51 - - - 0 0 0
1981-82 Vancouver Canucks NHL 52 20 18 12 3010 168 2 3.35 - 1368 0.891 0 2 0

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1314&dat=19820516&id=WGsjAAAAIBAJ&sjid=1-4DAAAAIBAJ&pg=3784,408819
  2. ^ Kreiser, John (26 January 2011). "A look at 'The Great One' by the numbers". Edmonton Oilers - Features. NHL.com. Retrieved 5 August 2012. 
  3. ^ WHA Hall of Fame Members
  4. ^ "Richard [Brodeur]". Diskin Galleries. May 9, 2006. Retrieved June 6, 2012. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Doug Grant
and Terry Richardson
Winner of the Terry Sawchuk Trophy
with Jim Park

1979–80
Succeeded by
Paul Harrison
and Ken Ellacott