Richard Cordery

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Richard Cordery
Occupation Actor
Years active 1978–present

Richard Cordery is a character actor[1] of film, television, and stage.

Career[edit]

Film and television[edit]

Some of his television credits include Doc Martin as Dennis Dodds, Whitechapel as George Collier, Garrow's Law as Sir Sampson Wright,[citation needed] and Midsomer Murders as Dr John Cole.[2] He played the Duc De Raguse in the 2012 film Les Misérables.[citation needed]

In the 2013 film About Time, Cordery played Uncle D, the "sweet but mentally-challenged" uncle of the protagonist Tim.[3]

Theatre[edit]

Much of Cordery's acting career has been in theatre. His body of work includes many Shakespeare performances, such as the tragedy Romeo and Juliet (1997),[4] the trilogy Henry VI (2000), the drama Richard III (2001), the tragedy Macbeth (2004), and the comedy The Winter's Tale.[5] In 2002, Cordery played Menenius in a Swan Theatre adaptation of the Shakespeare play Coriolanus.[6] Later that year, he appeared as Falstaff in another Shakespeare play, The Merry Wives of Windsor.[7] Cordery portrayed the steward Malvolio in a 2005 production of Twelfth Night at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre.[8]

In 2008, he played Russell Blackborough in the play Waste at the Almeida Theater[9] and the following year he appeared in the musical Spring Awakening at the Lyric Theatre.[10] Cordery appeared as Canon Chasuble in a 2011 production of The Importance of Being Earnest at the Rose Theatre, Kingston. The Daily Telegraph praised the actor for giving a "performance of comic bliss as the amorous and sententious Canon Chasuble, baffled by each new turn of events while supporting his prodigious bulk on a surprisingly nifty pair of pins."[11]

Personal life[edit]

Cordery is a former teacher who once taught in an inner-London secondary school.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Spencer, Charles (3 May 2005). "A flying piano, a sinking heart". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 1 December 2013. 
  2. ^ "Midsomer Murders Series 7 – 6. The Straw Woman - Part Two". Radio Times. Retrieved 1 December 2013. 
  3. ^ Felperin, Leslie (8 August 2013). "Film Review: ‘About Time’". Variety. Retrieved 1 December 2013. 
  4. ^ Butler, Robert (9 November 1997). "The Critics: Death in Life with Marguerite Duras, Life in Death with Romeo and Juliet". The Independent. Retrieved 1 December 2013 – via Highbeam.  (subscription required)
  5. ^ Smallwood, Robert Leo (2004). Players of Shakespeare 6: Essays in the Performance of Shakespeare's History Plays. p. 184. ISBN 9780521840880. 
  6. ^ Taylor, Paul (4 December 2002). "Arts: The Profession of Violence; in the Royal Shakespeare Company's New Coriolanus, PAUL TAYLOR Hails Greg Hicks's Powerful Portrayal of the Tragic Warrior Who Has Outlived His Usefulness". The Independent. Retrieved 1 December 2013 – via Highbeam.  (subscription required)
  7. ^ Edmonds, Richard (4 November 2002). "Reviews: Halloween Romp Ruins a Merry Night of Mirth; the Merry Wives of Windsor the Swan Stratford upon Avon". The Birmingham Post. Retrieved 1 December 2013 – via Highbeam.  (subscription required)
  8. ^ Edmonds, Richard (4 May 2005). "CULTURE: Forgettable Night; Twelfth Night Royal Shakespeare Theatre, Stratford-upon-Avon". The Birmingham Post. Retrieved 1 December 2013 – via Highbeam.  (subscription required)
  9. ^ Benedict, David (8 October 2008). "Waste". Variety. Retrieved 1 December 2013 – via Highbeam.  (subscription required)
  10. ^ David, Benedict (5 February 2009). "Spring Awakening". Variety. Retrieved 1 December 2013 – via Highbeam.  (subscription required)
  11. ^ Spencer, Charles (10 October 2011). "The Importance of Being Earnest, Rose Theatre, Kingston, review". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 1 December 2013. 
  12. ^ Coveney, Michael (4 July 2005). "Young bards". The Guardian. Retrieved 1 December 2013. 

External links[edit]