Richard Decker

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Richard Decker, (May 6, 1907 – November 1, 1988)[1] a cartoonist and illustrator, studied at the Pennsylvania School of Industrial Art[1] and became famous for his cartoons published in The New Yorker.[2]

Works[edit]

Decker worked almost 40 years as a contract cartoonist for the New Yorker. He started out in 1929 with the magazine and then eventually worked his way up to becoming well-known on the New Yorker's pages for cartoons. Decker's humor covers a broad spectrum from changing times to even his large family. Decker's work in ink and watercolor had been featured in several area exhibitions.[3] He did illustrations for "Look" and the "Saturday Evening Post"[4] and did a number of advertisements for the "Philadelphia Evening Bulletin".[3][5]

Recognition[edit]

Ben Yagoda has called Decker, along with Robert J. Day, "underrecognized New Yorker masters."[6]

Death[edit]

Decker died in November 1988 at Cathcart Health Care Center in Devon, Pennsylvania. He was a resident of Berwyn, Pennsylvania.[3]

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]