Richard Kidder

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Richard Kidder (1633–1703) was an English Anglican churchman, Bishop of Bath and Wells, from 1691 to his death. He was a noted theologian.

He was educated at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, where he was a sizar, from 1649, graduating 1652.[1] He became a Fellow there in 1655, and vicar of Stranground, Huntingdonshire, in 1659.[2] He was deprived in 1662.[3]

He was rector of Rayne Parva, Essex, from 1664 to 1674, having conformed to the Act of 1662. He was later vicar of St. Martin Outwich, London, and in 1689 a royal chaplain,[4] and dean of Peterborough.

His A Demonstration of the Messias[5] has been identified as a significant influence on the librettist Charles Jennens, in writing the words for the Messiah of Handel.[6] This book also took up suggestions of Joseph Mede on multiple authorship of the Book of Zechariah.[7]

He was killed in the Great Storm of 1703, on of 26/7 November;[8] he was in bed with his wife in the episcopal palace at Wells when the chimney fell on both of them.[9]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Kidder, Richard (KDR649R)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  2. ^ Concise Dictionary of National Biography.
  3. ^ [1], CNDB.
  4. ^ CNDB
  5. ^ A Demonstration of the Messias. In which the Truth of the Christian Religion is proved, against all the Enemies thereof; but especially against the Jews. In three volumes, published 1684, 1699, 1700.
  6. ^ [2]; Michael Marissen, Rejoicing against Judaism in Handel's Messiah, Journal of Musicology, Spring 2007, Vol. 24, No. 2, Pages 167-194.
  7. ^ Bible Survey: The Book of Zechariah
  8. ^ November 27, Every-Day Book
  9. ^ Newsletter 35

External links[edit]

Church of England titles
Preceded by
Thomas Ken
Bishop of Bath and Wells
1691–1703
Succeeded by
George Hooper