Richard L. Breen

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"Richard Breen" redirects here. For other uses, see Richard Breen (disambiguation).
Richard L. Breen
Born (1918-06-26)June 26, 1918
Chicago, Illinois, USA
Died February 1, 1967(1967-02-01) (aged 48)
Los Angeles, California, USA
Occupation Writer, Screenwriter, Director
Years active 1948-1967

Richard L. Breen (June 26, 1918 – February 1, 1967) was a Hollywood screenwriter and director. He began as a freelance radio writer. After a stint in the US Navy during World War II, he began writing for films and worked alone and in collaboration with such distinguished writers as Billy Wilder and Charles Brackett.

He won an Oscar for his work on the screenplay to Titanic (1953), and was nominated for A Foreign Affair (1948) and Captain Newman, M.D. (1963).

In 1957, he directed one film Stopover Tokyo, and then returned to screenwriting. He was president of the Screenwriters' Guild from 1952 to 1953.

He was also credited as "Richard Breen" and "Robert Breen".

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