Richard L. Evans

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Richard L. Evans
Richard L. Evans.JPG
Quorum of the Twelve Apostles
October 8, 1953 (1953-10-08) – November 1, 1971 (1971-11-01)
Called by David O. McKay
LDS Church Apostle
October 8, 1953 (1953-10-08) – November 1, 1971 (1971-11-01)
Called by David O. McKay
Reason Death of Albert E. Bowen
Reorganization
at end of term
Marvin J. Ashton ordained
First Council of the Seventy
October 7, 1938 (1938-10-07) – October 8, 1953 (1953-10-08)
Called by Heber J. Grant
End reason Called to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles
Personal details
Born Richard Louis Evans
(1906-03-23)March 23, 1906
Salt Lake City, Utah, United States
Died November 1, 1971(1971-11-01) (aged 65)
Salt Lake City, Utah, United States
Resting place Salt Lake City Cemetery
40°46′37.92″N 111°51′28.8″W / 40.7772000°N 111.858000°W / 40.7772000; -111.858000

Richard Louis Evans (March 23, 1906 – November 1, 1971) was a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) (1953–1971), the president of Rotary International (1966–1967), and the writer, producer, and announcer of Music and the Spoken Word for forty-one years[1] (1929–1971).

He received a BA and MA from the University of Utah. There, he joined Pi Kappa Alpha. He may have been best known as the announcer for the weekly Mormon Tabernacle Choir radio broadcast, Music and the Spoken Word: he wrote, produced, and announced the radio broadcasts, including a short inspirational message. Evans' weekly broadcasts spanned from its inception in 1929 until his death in 1971.

Evans' voice was familiar to Latter-day Saints everywhere as the narrator of various church productions, most notably Man's Search for Happiness. He also introduced the Salt Lake City choir's contribution to Bing Crosby's annual "Christmas Sing with Bing" radio broadcasts during the 1950s, and is heard on the 1956 Decca LP of the same name, which featured the previous year's "Christmas Sing" edition.

He was ordained an apostle on October 8, 1953, following the death of Albert E. Bowen.

Evans was the last LDS Church apostle to sport facial hair while in office,[citation needed] wearing a neatly trimmed mustache until the mid-1960s.

He died at age 65 on November 1, 1971. The vacancy in the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles from his death was filled by Marvin J. Ashton. Evans was buried at Salt Lake City Cemetery.

Grave marker of Richard L. Evans (front).
Grave marker of Richard L. Evans (back).

Published works[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "History > Richard L. Evans" at musicandthespokenword.com [1]

References[edit]

Media offices
Preceded by
Ted Kimball
Announcer, Music and the Spoken Word
June, 1930–October, 1971
Succeeded by
J. Spencer Kinard
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints titles
Preceded by
Adam S. Bennion
Quorum of the Twelve Apostles
October 8, 1953–November 1, 1971
Succeeded by
George Q. Morris
Non-profit organization positions
Preceded by
C.P.H. Teenstra
President of Rotary International
1966-1967
Succeeded by
Luther H. Hodges