Richard Lynch Cotton

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Richard Lynch Cotton
St James' parish church in Denchworth, Berkshire, where Cotton was vicar from 1823 to 1838.

Rev. Richard Lynch Cotton (14 August 1794 – 8 December 1880) was a British vicar and academic administrator at the University of Oxford.[1]

Cotton was born in Whitchurch, Oxfordshire,[2] the son of Henry Calveley Cotton and Matilda Lockwood, one of 11 children (eight sons and three daughters).[3] He was educated at Charterhouse School and Worcester College, Oxford, where he attained a BA degree in 1815. He was a Fellow of the College from 1816 to 1838 and Provost from 1839 to 1880.[4] He was awarded a Doctor of Divinity in 1839. While Provost at Worcester, Cotton also became Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University in 1852.

Cotton was Vicar of Denchworth, north of Wantage in Berkshire, from 1823 to 1838. He published his lectures and sermons.[5] On 25 June 1839, he married Charlotte Bouverie Pusey, daughter of Hon. Philip Pusey and Lady Lucy Sherard.[3] She lived at 38 St Giles' in Oxford, now part of St Benet's Hall, after Cotton's death during 1881–82.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Cotton, Richard Lynch". The Concise Dictionary of National Biography. Volume I: A–F. Oxford University Press. 1995. p. 659. 
  2. ^ "Richard Lynch Cotton". RA Collections. Royal Academy of Arts. Retrieved July 13, 2011. 
  3. ^ a b "Reverend Richard Lynch Cotton". Person Page — 24694. thePeerage.com. Retrieved July 13, 2011. 
  4. ^ H. E. Salter and Mary D. Lobel, ed. (1954). "Gloucester Hall and Worcester College". A History of the County of Oxford: Volume 3: The University of Oxford. Victoria County History. pp. 298–309. Retrieved July 15, 2011. 
  5. ^ "Books by Richard Lynch Cotton". BerkelouW Books. Retrieved July 13, 2011. 
  6. ^ "No. 38: St Benet's Hall". St Giles', Oxford. Oxford History, UK. Retrieved June 11, 2012. 

Further reading[edit]

Academic offices
Preceded by
Whittington Landon
Provost of Worcester College, Oxford
1839–1880
Succeeded by
William Inge
Preceded by
Frederick Charles Plumptre
Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University
1852–1856
Succeeded by
David Williams