Richard Neave

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For the 18th century baronet, see Sir Richard Neave, 1st Baronet.

Richard Neave (born c 1936)[1] is a British expert in forensic facial reconstruction. Neave became an expert in anatomical art and was on the staff of the Unit of Art in Medicine at the University of Manchester. He has used his skill in recreating faces from skulls in police forensic work and in producing images of historical figures. One of his reconstruction was of a prehistoric bog body known as Yde Girl.[2] In 1998 a murder investigation resulted in a successful prosecution as a result of Neave's work.[3] Neave's archaeological reconstructions include Philip II of Macedon[4] and Midas.[5] In 2001, the television program Son of God used one of three first-century Jewish skulls from a leading department of forensic science in Israel to depict Jesus in a new way. Neave constructed a face using forensic anthropology which suggested that Jesus would have had a broad face and large nose, and differed significantly from the traditional depictions of Jesus in renaissance art.[6]

Notable Works[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pandora Melly Games People Play: Richard Neave, 61, medical artist Independent Saturday, 21 February 1998
  2. ^ Prag, John; Neave, Richard (1997). Making faces: using forensic and archaeological evidence [Bodies from the Bog]. London: British Museum. pp. 157–171. ISBN 0-7141-1743-9. 
  3. ^ BBC Murderer caught by artist's skill Friday, July 17, 1998
  4. ^ Reconstruction of the face of Philip II by Richard Neave
  5. ^ "Reconstruction of King Midas" Reconstruction of "King Midas" by Richard Neave
  6. ^ Fillon, Mike. "The Real Face of Jesus". Popular Mechanics. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  7. ^ Richard Neave; Denise Smith. "King Midas". RN-DS Partnership. Retrieved 14 March 2012. 
  8. ^ Richard Neave; Denise Smith. "The Yde Girl". RN-DS Partnership. Retrieved 14 March 2012. 
  9. ^ "Lindow Man: what did he look like?". British Museum. 
  10. ^ Trustees of the British Museum. "indow Man: What Did He Look Like?". British Museum. 
  11. ^ "Sensaos: Encounter the Girl in the Mummy". 18 April 1998. Retrieved 15 March 2012. (subscription required)
  12. ^ http://www.crystalinks.com/mummy.html
  13. ^ Richard Neave; Denise Smith. "King Philip II of Macedon". RN-DS Partnership. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  14. ^ http://www.rn-ds-partnership.com/maryrose.html
  15. ^ Balkan Stromatological Society. "Balkan Journal of Stromatology". p. 73. Retrieved 16 March 2012.