Richard Olivier de Longueil

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Richard Olivier de Longueil (1406–1470) (called the Cardinal of Coutances or the Cardinal of Eu) was a French Roman Catholic bishop and cardinal.

Biography[edit]

Richard Olivier de Longueil was born in Lisieux on December 18, 1406, the son of Guillaume III de Longueil, sieur of Eu, and his second wife, Catherine de Bourguenole.[1] His family was an old noble family from Normandy.[1]

After receiving a licentiate in law, Longueil became a protonotary apostolic.[1] He went on to become president of the Chambre des comptes and cantor of Lisieux Cathedral.[1] He became a canon of Rouen Cathedral and Archdeacon of Eu.[1] In 1452, the cathedral chapter of Rouen Cathedral wished to make him Archbishop of Rouen, but he declined.[1]

In 1453, he was elected Bishop of Countances.[1] He was consecrated as a bishop on September 28, 1453.[1] He was preconized as bishop by Pope Callixtus III on October 3, 1453, and took the oath of loyalty to Charles VII of France on May 12, 1454.[1] He occupied the see of Coutances until his death.[1]

On June 11, 1455, Pope Callixtus III named Bishop Longueil, along with Guillaume d'Estouteville, Archbishop of Rouen and Guillaume Chartier, Bishop of Paris, to a papal commission charged with posthumously retrying Joan of Arc.[1] Her rehabilitation was pronounced in the archiepiscopal palace of Rouen on July 7, 1456.[1] Pleased with this outcome, Charles VII named Longueil to the Grand Conseil and later honored him with his trust by naming him as Charles' envoy on a mission to Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy.[1]

At the request of the King of France, Pope Callixtus III made Longueil a cardinal priest in the consistory of December 17, 1456.[1] He did not participate in the papal conclave of 1458 and the red hat did not arrive in France until later in 1458.[1] Shortly after, in the Estates General, he proposed revoking the Pragmatic Sanction of Bourges (1438); for this action, he was praised by Pope Pius II and fined 10,000 livres by the Estates.[1]

On August 15, 1461, he attended the coronation of Louis XI of France and shortly thereafter resigned as president of the Chambres des comptes.[1]

Louis XI revoked the Pragmatic Sanction of Bourges and Cardinal Longueil was part of a delegation (including Jean Jouffroy, Bishop of Arras) sent to inform the pope.[1] They arrived in Rome on March 13, 1462; were received by the pope on March 14; and the ceremony recognizing the abrogation of the Pragmatic Sanction took place in a consistory held on March 16.[1] In that same consistory, Longueil was given the titular church of Sant'Eusebio.[1]

Cardinal Longueil now fixed his residence in Rome and became a close adviser of the pope.[1] As a result of his having left France, on May 24, 1463, the Conseil du Roi issued an order stopping all his benefices.[1]

He participated in the papal conclave of 1464 that elected Pope Paul II.[1] The new pope named him archpriest of St Mark's Basilica, Venice.[1] On October 1, 1464, the pope named him papal legate to Perugia. He returned to Rome on February 10, 1468.[1]

He died in Sutri on August 19, 1470. He was buried in St Mark's Basilica.[1] His death was commemorated in Rouen Cathedral on August 19 until the time of the French Revolution.[1]

References[edit]