Richard Patten

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Richard Andrew Patten
MPP
In office
1995–2007
Preceded by Evelyn Gigantes
Succeeded by Yasir Naqvi
Constituency Ottawa Centre
In office
1987–1990
Preceded by Evelyn Gigantes
Succeeded by Evelyn Gigantes
Constituency Ottawa Centre
Personal details
Born (1942-05-13) 13 May 1942 (age 72)
Montreal, Quebec
Political party Liberal Party
Occupation YMCA Manager
Religion Unitarian

Richard Andrew Patten (born 13 May 1942) is a former politician in Ontario, Canada. Patten was a member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario, representing the riding of Ottawa Centre.

Background[edit]

Patten was educated at Sir George Williams University in Montreal. Before entering public life, he was a manager with the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA), and served as President of the Canadian Council for International Cooperation. Patten sat on an NGO advisory committee to the World Bank while with the CCIC.

Politics[edit]

Patten served during the 34th, 36th, 37th and 38th Legislative Assemblies of Ontario as a member of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Patten was first elected to the Ontario legislature in the 1987 provincial election, defeating incumbent New Democrat Evelyn Gigantes by just over 2,000 votes in Ottawa Centre. Patten was appointed as cabinet minister in the government of David Peterson, serving as Minister of Government Services and later as Minister of Correctional Services.

In the 1990 provincial election Patten was defeated by his NDP rival Gigantes. For the next five years, Patten served as President and CEO of the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) Foundation, doing extensive fund-raising work for the organization.

In 1995 provincial election Patten campaigned against Gigantes once again this time defeating her by 1,700 votes. The Progressive Conservatives won the election, and Patten joined 29 other Liberals in the opposition. He attempted to mobilize a campaign for the party's leadership in 1996, but failed in this effort and subsequently supported Dwight Duncan. When Duncan was eliminated after the third ballot, he endorsed Dalton McGuinty, the eventual winner.[1]

In the 1999 provincial election, Patten was re-elected over opponents PC Ray Kostuck and NDP Elisabeth Arnold. The Progressive Conservatives again won the election, and Patten remained in opposition.[2] Patten was treated for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma during this parliament.[citation needed]

The Liberals won the 2003 election and he was re-elected again by over 10,000 votes.[2][3] During this session he served as parliamentary assistant to the Minister of Education, the Minister of Economic Development and Trade and to Premier Dalton McGuinty. Patten maintained a strong interest in the CHEO and devoted legislative efforts towards the centre's operations.[2]

On 14 March 2007, Patten announced he would not seek re-election in the upcoming election, preferring to focus on work with the CHEO Foundation.[3]

Cabinet positions[edit]

Provincial Government of David Peterson
Cabinet Posts (2)
Predecessor Office Successor
David Ramsay Minister of Correctional Services
1989-1990
Mike Farnan
Sean Conway Minister of Government Services
1987-1989
Chris Ward

Electoral record[edit]

Ontario general election, 2003: Ottawa Centre
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Liberal Richard Patten 22,295 45.10 +6.93 $ 72,458.74
New Democratic Jeff Atkinson 11,362 22.98 -2.48 49,598.63
Progressive Conservative Joe Varner 11,217 22.69 -10.05 17,112.70
Green Chris Bradshaw 3,821 7.73 +5.11 9,283.05
Communist Stuart Ryan 306 0.62 +0.25 878.30
Freedom Matt Szymanowicz 218 0.44   0.00
Independent Fakhry Guirguis 214 0.43   1,094.74
Total valid votes/Expense Limit 49,433 100.0   +5.08 $ 85,928.64
Total rejected ballots 360 0.72 -0.11
Turnout 49,793 55.63 +2.67
Eligible voters 89,509   -0.07
Ontario general election, 1999: Ottawa Centre
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Liberal Richard Patten 17,956 38.17 -1.09 $ 48,983.01
Progressive Conservative Ray Kostuch 15,403 32.74 +9.10 54,104.81
New Democratic Elisabeth Arnold 11,977 25.46 -7.77 58,863.46
Green Chris Bradshaw 1,231 2.62 +1.39 4,119.65
Communist Marvin Glass 174 0.37 -0.37 1,384.26
Natural Law Wayne Foster 170 0.36 -0.93 0.00
Independent Mistahi Corkill 132 0.28   0.00
Total valid votes/Expense Limit 47,043 100.0   +65.64 $ 85,987.20
Total rejected ballots 395 0.83 -0.27
Turnout 47,438 52.96 -10.92
Eligible voters 89,570   +99.23
Ontario general election, 1995: Ottawa Centre
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Liberal Richard Patten 11,150 39.26 +0.98 $ 44,245.00
New Democratic Evelyn Gigantes 9,438 33.23 -14.47 39,455.24
Progressive Conservative Chris Thompson 6,715 23.64 +14.70 31,048.00
Natural Law Ron Parker 365 1.29   0.00
Green Andrew Van Iterson 349 1.23 -0.66 200.00
Communist Malek Khouri 210 0.74   1,086.25
Independent John C. Turmel 173 0.61 +0.08 0.00
Total valid votes 28,400 100.0   -6.72  
Total rejected ballots 317 1.10
Turnout 28,717 63.88
Eligible voters 44,958
Ontario general election, 1990: Ottawa Centre
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
New Democratic Evelyn Gigantes 14,522 47.70 +7.64
Liberal Richard Patten 11,656 38.28 -8.88
Progressive Conservative Alex Burney 2,723 8.94 -1.8
Family Coalition John Gray 809 2.66  
Green Bill Hipwell 576 1.89  
Independent John Turmel 160 0.53 -1.50
Total valid votes 30,446 100.0   +3.54
Ontario general election, 1987: Ottawa Centre
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Richard Patten 13,867 47.16 +21.20
New Democratic Evelyn Gigantes 11,780 40.06 -3.39
Progressive Conservative Greg Vezina 3,159 10.74 -18.51
Independent John Turmel 598 2.03 +0.70
Total valid votes 29,404 100.0   +7.46

References[edit]

  1. ^ . Ottawa Citizen. 2 December 1996.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  2. ^ a b c Conway-Smith, Erin; Wilson publisher=Centretown News, Candace (10 October 2003). "Patten to pursue pet projects". 
  3. ^ a b "Ottawa MPP Patten to retire from politics". CBC News. 14 March 2007. Retrieved 2014-05-27. 

External links[edit]