Richard Peddie

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Richard A. Peddie
CEO and President of MLSE
In office
October 1998[1] – December 31, 2011[2]
Preceded by new post
Succeeded by Tom Anselmi - as President
Personal details
Born January 1947
Windsor, Ontario
Nationality Canadian
Residence Toronto
Alma mater University of Windsor

Richard A. Peddie (born January 1947[3] in Windsor, Ontario) is a former President and CEO of Maple Leafs Sports and Entertainment.

Personal life[edit]

A native of Windsor, Ontario, Peddie graduated from the University of Windsor in 1970 and received an honorary doctorate from the institution in 2001. Peddie lives in Toronto with his wife.

Career[edit]

Peddie was President and CEO of SkyDome from August 1989 to 1994.[1][4][5][6] In 1993 he took a leave of absence for six months to join Larry Tanenbaum's Palestra Group, which included Labatt, in their pursuit of an expansion National Basketball Association team for Toronto,[1][4][6][7] which was ultimately awarded to a competing group and became the Toronto Raptors. While employed by the SkyDome, he was twice offered the head job of the Toronto Argonauts of the Canadian Football League, who played at the SkyDome.[4]

Peddie was named the President and COO of Labatt Communications in 1994, a subsidy of Labatt Brewing Company whose assets included The Sports Network and Discovery Channel Canada.[1][5][6] During his time with Labatt's, which also owned the Argonauts and Toronto Blue Jays of Major League Baseball, he was involved with attempts by the company to purchasing a National Football League team and relocate it to Toronto's SkyDome.[8][9]

Maple Leafs Sports and Entertainment[edit]

Richard Peddie was named President and CEO of the Toronto Raptors in November 1996.[5][6][10] After Maple Leaf Gardens Ltd. (owner of the Toronto Maple Leafs) purchased the Toronto Raptors and the arena the team was building, Air Canada Centre, on February 12, 1998,[11] Peddie took control of the renamed Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment in October 1998,[1] serving as President and CEO for fourteen years until his retirement effective December 31, 2011.[2][7] He oversaw all business and team operations related to the Toronto Maple Leafs, the Toronto Raptors, Toronto FC, the Toronto Marlies, the operations of the Air Canada Centre, BMO Field, Ricoh Coliseum, the organization’s three television channels (Leafs TV, NBA TV Canada, GolTV Canada) and Maple Leaf Square.

In his first nine years in charge of MLSE, he tripled its value to $1.5 billion.[12] On December 9, 2011, shortly before Peddie retired, the Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan announced the sale of its 79.53% majority stake in MLSE to Bell Canada and Rogers Communications, in a deal valued at $1.32 billion.[13][14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "One-on-One with Richard Peddie, CEO, Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment". 2005-02-21. Retrieved 2013-12-27. 
  2. ^ a b Feschuk, Dave (2012-01-08-). "Newly retired Peddie muses on life after MLSE". Toronto Star. Retrieved 2013-12-17. 
  3. ^ Hunter, Paul (2010-11-10). "Peddie calls retirement talk ‘premature'". The Star (Toronto). 
  4. ^ a b c Peddie, Richard (2013). Dream Job. Harper Collins. 
  5. ^ a b c "Richard Peddie". Retrieved 2013-12-27. 
  6. ^ a b c d "Richard A. Peddie". Bloomberg. Retrieved 2013-12-27. 
  7. ^ a b "Richard Peddie". University of Windsor. Retrieved 2013-12-27. 
  8. ^ "Tampa Bay Buccaneers". 1994-11-13. Retrieved 2013-12-27. 
  9. ^ "PRO FOOTBALL; Labatt Reported To Eye Buccaneers". New York Times. 1994-11-13. Retrieved 2013-12-27. 
  10. ^ "Richard Peddie BComm '70, LLD '01". University of Windsor. Retrieved 2013-12-27. 
  11. ^ NBA AT A GLANCE / DAILY REPORT, latimes.com, March 28, 1998, accessed July 7, 2011.
  12. ^ Vardi, Nathan (2007-11-16). "Winning Isn't Everything". Forbes. Retrieved 2007-11-16. 
  13. ^ "BCE and Rogers team up to buy 75 percent of MLSE". TSN.ca. Retrieved 9 December 2011. 
  14. ^ "Teachers' completes $1.32-billion sale of MLSE". Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan. 2012-08-22. Retrieved 2013-12-27. 

External links[edit]