Richard R. Nacy

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Richard R. Nacy (November 7, 1895 – January 10, 1961), was a U.S. politician from Missouri.[1]

Biography[edit]

Richard R. Nacy was born and raised in Jefferson City, Missouri. As a young boy, he was a very talented baseball player and was heavily scouted by the major leagues. However, his father died when he was 16 and he had to quit school to help support his family. During World War I, he served in the Allied Expeditionary Forces in France. Following the war, he was elected as City Clerk of Jefferson City in June 1919, serving in that post for nearly four years. In February 1920, he was married to the former Anna F. Dorsey and had three sons. In January 1923, he became Circuit Court Clerk of Cole County, Missouri, and was reelected to two additional terms in 1926 and 1930. In 1932, he was elected as State Treasurer of Missouri. During his tenure, the state endured one of the most distressing times in banking history due to the Great Depression. Upon completion of his term as State Treasurer in January 1937, he became a Vice President at the Jefferson City-based Central Missouri Trust Company. From August 1948 to January 1949, he served as State Treasurer again, filling a vacancy created by the death of incumbent Robert W. Winn. Upon completion of his second term as State Treasurer, he returned to Central Missouri Trust Company, where he served as President until his death. He was mentioned in Theodore White's book "The Making of a President 1960" as being instrumental in bringing conservative Missouri into the Kennedy camp and helping ensure Kennedy's election in 1960. He died just ten days before the inaugural, to which he and his wife had been invited.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Richard R. Nacy". Clint Zweifel. Retrieved 2010-12-10. 
Political offices
Preceded by
Larry Brunk
Missouri State Treasurer
1933–1937
Succeeded by
Robert W. Winn
Preceded by
Robert W. Winn
Missouri State Treasurer
1948–1949
Succeeded by
Mount Etna Morris