Richard Richards (Utah)

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Richard Richards
52nd Chairman of the Republican National Committee
In office
1981–1983
Preceded by Bill Brock
Succeeded by Frank J. Fahrenkopf, Jr.
Personal details
Born (1932-05-14)May 14, 1932
Died January 30, 2015(2015-01-30) (aged 82)
Political party Republican

Richard (Dick) Richards (May 14, 1932 – January 30, 2015) was an American political activist who served as Chairman of the Republican National Committee from 1981 to 1983. He was active in the Republican party and politics from the late 1960s until the 1980s. He was born in Ogden, Utah.[1]

Richards served in the United States Army from 1952 until 1955, finishing his service as an officer with the 7th Cavalry Regiment.

Before being drafted, Richards had been active in politics, organizing the Junior Republican League while studying at Weber State College in Ogden, Utah. He graduated from the University of Utah Law School and was active in the political campaigns of Douglas R. Stringfellow, Laurence J. Burton and Dr. Henry Aldous Dixon, organizing a youth group that helped Dr. Dixon win election to the United States Congress.[2] He later served as a member of the Republican National Committee and Chairman of the Utah Republican Party, and was the first state chairman to endorse Ronald Reagan for President in 1976.[3]

He resided near Ogden with his wife. Richards was a Latter-day Saint .[4] Richards died at his home on January 30, 2015 at the age of 82.[5]

The Richard Richards Institute of Weber State University is named for him.[6]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Braddock Publications, The Executive Bio-pictorial Directory, 1981, page 231
  2. ^ Sarah Langsdon, Melissa Johnson, Legendary Locals of Ogden: Utah, 2012, page 79
  3. ^ Ronald Reagan, Remarks at a Reception Honoring Richard Richards, Chairman of the Republican National Committee, January 27, 1983
  4. ^ Michael K. Winder, Presidents and Prophets (American Fork, Utah: Covenant Communications, 2007), p. 347
  5. ^ http://www.sltrib.com/home/2121671-155/richard-richards-republican-party-icon-dies
  6. ^ Richard Richards Institute