Richard S. Aldrich

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Richard S. Aldrich
Richard S. Aldrich.jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Rhode Island's 2nd district
In office
March 4, 1923 – March 3, 1933
Preceded by Walter Russell Stiness
Succeeded by John Matthew O'Connell
Member of the Rhode Island Senate
In office
1916–1918
Member of the Rhode Island House of Representatives
In office
1887–1890
Personal details
Born (1884-02-29)February 29, 1884
Washington, D.C., USA
Died December 25, 1941(1941-12-25) (aged 57)
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Resting place Swan Point Cemetery
Providence, Rhode Island
Nationality American
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Janet Innis White
Relations John Winthrop
John Steere
William Wickenden
Roger Williams
Abigail Greene "Abby" Aldrich
John Davison Rockefeller, Jr.
Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller
Winthrop Williams Aldrich
Children Richard Steere Aldrich
Parents Nelson W. Aldrich
Abby Pearce Chapman
Alma mater Yale
Harvard Law School
Occupation Attorney
Politician

Richard Steere Aldrich (February 29, 1884 – December 25, 1941) was an American lawyer and politician. He was a Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives, and served in the Rhode Island State Senate and the Rhode Island House of Representatives.

Early life and education[edit]

Aldrich was born in Washington, D.C., where his father Nelson W. Aldrich was serving in Congress.[1] He was raised in Providence, Rhode Island and attended the public schools. He graduated from Hope Street High School in Providence in 1902,[2] from Yale University in 1906,[3] and from Harvard Law School in 1909.[4]

In 1911, he was admitted to the bar and began the practice of law in New York City.[5] He returned to Providence in 1913, and continued practicing law.

Political career[edit]

He moved to Warwick, Rhode Island[6] and became involved in politics and was a member of the Rhode Island House of Representatives from 1914-1916,[7] and served in the Rhode Island Senate from 1916-1918.[8]

Aldrich was elected as a Republican candidate to the Sixty-eighth Congress and to the four succeeding Congresses, serving from March 4, 1923 to March 3, 1933.[9] He was not a candidate for renomination in 1932. While in Congress, he spoke out against the Immigration Act of 1924, that limited the annual number of immigrants who could be admitted from any country.[10]

After leaving Congress, he resumed his legal carer in Providence until his death there on December 25, 1941. He is interred in Swan Point Cemetery in Providence.

Family Prominence[edit]

Aldrich was born into a family descended from John Winthrop,[11] William Wickenden, Roger Williams and John Steere.[12][13][14]

He was the son of Nelson W. Aldrich and Abby Pearce Chapman. His father was a leader of the Republican Party in the Senate, where he served from 1881 to 1911.[15]

His sister Abigail Greene "Abby" Aldrich[16] was a philanthropist who married philanthropist John Davison Rockefeller, Jr.,[17] and their second son Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller was a four-term Governor of New York who campaigned for the Republican presidential nomination in 1960, 1964, and 1968, and was named Vice President of the United States under President Gerald Ford by the Congress in 1974.[18]

His brother was Winthrop Williams Aldrich, who served as chairman of the Chase National Bank).[19]

Personal life[edit]

Aldrich married Janet Innis White on April 30, 1921.[20] Their son was Richard Steere Aldrich.[21]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "ALDRICH, Nelson Wilmarth, (1841 - 1915)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved April 7, 2014. 
  2. ^ Rhode Island. Dept. of State (1916). Manual, with Rules and Orders, for the Use of the General Assembly of the State of Rhode Island. Rhode Island. Dept. of State. p. 393. 
  3. ^ Yale (1916). The Yale Alumni Weekly Vol XXVI No 1. Yale. p. 314. 
  4. ^ Yale University (1910). Catalogue of the Officers and Graduates of Yale University in New Haven Connecticut. The University. p. 226. 
  5. ^ Fifield, James Clark (1918). The American Bar. J.C. Fifield Compan. p. 599. 
  6. ^ Rhode Island. Dept. of State (1916). Manual, with Rules and Orders, for the Use of the General Assembly of the State of Rhode Island. Rhode Island. Dept. of State. p. 393. 
  7. ^ Fifield, James Clark (1918). The American Bar. J.C. Fifield Compan. p. 599. 
  8. ^ Yale (1916). The Yale Alumni Weekly Vol XXVI No 1. Yale. p. 314. 
  9. ^ Legislative Reference Bureau (1923). Wisconsin Blue Book, 1923. Legislative Reference Bureau. p. 684. 
  10. ^ Gerstle, Gary (2001). American Crucible: Race and Nation in the Twentieth Century. Princeton University Press. p. 116. 
  11. ^ "Descendants of John Bigelow and Mary Warren". Ancestry.com. Retrieved April 7, 2014. 
  12. ^ William G. McLoughlin, Rhode Island, a History, (W.W. Norton & Co. 1986), 149 [1]
  13. ^ James Pierce Root, Steere Genealogy: A Record of the Descendants of John Steere, who Settled in Providence, Rhode Island, about the year 1660, (Providence: Riverside Press, 1890).
  14. ^ James Pierce Root, Steere Genealogy: A Record of the Descendants of John Steere, who Settled in Providence, Rhode Island, about the year 1660, (Providence: Riverside Press, 1890).
  15. ^ "ALDRICH, Nelson Wilmarth, (1841 - 1915)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved April 7, 2014. 
  16. ^ "Abby Greene Aldrich Rockefeller, 1874-1948". Rockefeller Archive Center. Retrieved April 7, 2014. 
  17. ^ "Abby John D. Rockefeller, 1874-1960". Rockefeller Archive Center. Retrieved April 7, 2014. 
  18. ^ "Rockefeller Family Archives". Rockefeller Archive Center. Retrieved April 7, 2014. 
  19. ^ Lowe, T. (1916). National Courier, Volume 7, Issue 35. T. Lowe. p. 13. 
  20. ^ Yale (1920). Yale Alumni Weekly, Volume 30. Yale. p. 920. 
  21. ^ "Paid Notice: Deaths ALDRICH, FRANCES "DAISY" DAGGETT". The New York Times. Retrieved April 7, 2014. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]


United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Walter Russell Stiness
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Rhode Island's 2nd congressional district

1923-1933
Succeeded by
John Matthew O'Connell

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.