Rick Nolan

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Rick Nolan
Rick Nolan official photo.jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Minnesota's 8th district
Incumbent
Assumed office
January 3, 2013
Preceded by Chip Cravaack
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Minnesota's 6th district
In office
January 3, 1975 – January 3, 1981
Preceded by John M. Zwach
Succeeded by Vin Weber
Member of the Minnesota House of Representatives
from the 53A district
In office
1969–1972
Succeeded by Raymond Kempe
Personal details
Born (1943-12-17) December 17, 1943 (age 70)
Brainerd, Minnesota
Political party Minnesota Democratic–Farmer–Labor Party
Spouse(s) Mary (Current), Marjorie (Divorced)
Residence Crosby, Minnesota
Alma mater St. John’s University
University of Minnesota (B.A.)
University of Maryland, College Park
St. Cloud State University
Profession business executive and educator
Religion Catholic
Website Representative Rick Nolan

Richard Michael "Rick" Nolan (born December 17, 1943) is an American politician who has been the U.S. Representative for Minnesota's 8th congressional district since 2013. A member of the Minnesota Democratic–Farmer–Labor Party, he previously served as the U.S. Representative for Minnesota's 6th congressional district from 1975 to 1981. After re-entering politics in 2011, he was nominated to challenge first-term incumbent Republican Chip Cravaack in the 8th district,[1] defeating Cravaack on November 6, 2012.[2]

Early life[edit]

Nolan was born in Brainerd, Minnesota and graduated from Brainerd High School in 1962. He attended St. John’s University in Collegeville, Minnesota the following year, but completed his undergraduate studies at the University of Minnesota, earning his B.A. in 1966. Nolan pursued postgraduate work in public administration and policy formation at the University of Maryland, College Park, and in education at St. Cloud State University.[3]

Early in his career he served as a staff assistant to Walter Mondale in the United States Senate.[4] He also pursued a career in business as an owner and operator of sawmill and wood pallet factory in Emily, Minnesota, and was a teacher of social studies in Royalton, Minnesota.[3]

Early political career[edit]

Nolan during his first stint in Congress in the 1970s

Nolan was elected to the Minnesota House of Representatives in 1968 and served two terms (1969-72), representing House District 53A (Morrison County).[5] He then ran unsuccessfully for Minnesota's 6th congressional district seat in the United States House of Representatives in 1972, but was elected in his second run in 1974 to the 94th Congress and reelected in 1976 to the 95th Congress and 1978 to the 96th Congress.

See also:

In 1979, he broke with his party in endorsing Senator Ted Kennedy for President over the sitting Democratic President Jimmy Carter.[4][6]

In 2007, he endorsed Connecticut Senator Christopher Dodd in his campaign for President of the United States, and traveled the state of Iowa campaigning on his behalf.[7]

Business career[edit]

Nolan decided not to run for reelection in 1980, and served as president of the U.S. Export Corporation until 1986, and president of the Minnesota World Trade Center under Governor Rudy Perpich from 1987 to 1994.[3][5] He has also served as chairman of the Mission Township[8] Planning Committee, president and board member of the Central Lakes College foundation, and lecturer and volunteer for the Initiative Foundation on Serving in Public Office.

Return to politics[edit]

2012 campaign for U.S. Congress[edit]

Nolan announced his candidacy for United States Congress on July 12, 2011, challenging incumbent Chip Cravaack in Minnesota's 8th congressional district.[9] He won the Democratic primary in August 2012, defeating Tarryl Clark and Jeff Anderson.[10][11]

2014 campaign for U.S. Congress[edit]

Nolan is running for re-election in 2014. The Democratic primary takes place on August 12, 2014, with the general election slated for November 4, 2014. As of March 2014, Nolan has not drawn a primary challenger. Stewart Mills is running for the Republican nomination.[12] According to Politico, Nolan is a vulnerable Democrat in a competitive congressional district. He is being targeted by Americans for Prosperity over his support of the Affordable Care Act.[13]

Issues[edit]

2nd Amendment[edit]

In October 1975, Rick Nolan said “I do feel that most murders are committed with handguns by generally law abiding citizens.”[14][verification needed]

In January 2013, Rick Nolan called the assault weapon ban, which expired in 2004, common sense legislation, saying he didn’t need an assault weapon to kill a duck.[15]

Taxes[edit]

During a debate in 2012, Nolan said that taxes should be raised and that provisions in the tax code that encourage offshoring should be eliminated. Nolan also said that the "super-rich" in particular should be targeted for tax increases.[16]

Spending[edit]

Nolan has voiced support for the stimulus spending championed by President Obama. He said, "It did in fact create good jobs in a whole wide range of areas, not the least of which is in the field of transportation."

Health care[edit]

Nolan supports the Affordable Care Act and said he would not vote to repeal it. Nolan said, "It ensures that another 30 million people in this country would have health insurance; it provides that nobody can be denied as a result of preconditions; it provides that parents can keep their children insured up to the age of 26."[17]

Veterans[edit]

Nolan was one of four members of Congress to vote against the 2014 Veterans Affairs appropriations bill. The bill provided $337.5 million less funding for VA programs than the President's proposal. In a statement, Nolan said, "I voted against the bill in protest, because it under-funds veterans health and benefit programs, while shoveling billions of new dollars into unnecessary new military construction in places all around the world where American presence and American resources do not belong."[18]

Mining[edit]

Nolan supports increased federal investment in the mining industry, including a “$250 million-a-year research center that would look at newer, cheaper and more environmentally friendly ways of extracting resources from the region.”[19] He also advocates speeding up the environmental review process for mining companies.[19]

"No Government, No Pay" Act[edit]

On October 1, 2013, Nolan introduced a bill that would the withhold pay of members of Congress during a government shutdown, in response to the shutdown that had gone into effect that morning. “It’s time for Congress to start living in the real world - where you either do your job, or you don’t get paid,” he said concerning the bill, which stood in opposition to the 27th Amendment to the Constitution.[20]

113th Congress[edit]

Given his previous six years of service, Nolan's chamber seniority has placed him at 235 out of 433 members.[21] This places him both at the head of the 113th Congress's 2013 freshman class, as well as ahead of members with three terms or less.

Rick Nolan sits on the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, and four of its Subcommittees: (1) Highways and Transit; (2) Aviation; (3) Economic Development, Public Buildings and Emergency Management; and (4) Water Resources and the Environment.[22] He also serves on the House Agriculture Committee and two of its Subcommittees: (1) Conservation, Energy and Forestry, and (2) Livestock, Rural Development, and Credit.[22]

Nolan has previously served on the House Small Business Committee and the House Agriculture Committee; his previous appointments would have earned him some Committee Seniority on these committees that he had already served on[23] in the 94th, 95th and 96th Congresses.[24] Instead, Nolan will now have Committee Seniority on only the House Agriculture Committee and be a junior member of the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee.

Nolan had been quoted as saying he would like to serve on "the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, along with the Natural Resources Committee, which hears legislation that directly affects the mining, forestry, agriculture and tourism-based economy of the Eighth Congressional District.".[25][26]

Electoral history[edit]

See also: United States House of Representatives elections in Minnesota, 2012#District 8
2012 Eighth Congressional District of Minnesota Elections[27]
Party Candidate Votes %
DFL Rick Nolan 191,981 54.3%
Republican Chip Cravaack (incumbent) 160,520 45.39%
Write-ins 1,164 .33%
Totals 353,665 100.0%
Voter turnout  %
DFL gain from Republican

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ O'Rourke, Mike (July 12, 2011). "Nolan makes bid for Congress official". Brainerd Dispatch. Retrieved 2012-06-18. 
  2. ^ "Nolan defeats Cravaack in 8th District". MPR News. November 6, 2012. Retrieved 2013-12-13. 
  3. ^ a b c "NOLAN, Richard Michael - Biographical Information". Bioguide.congress.gov. Retrieved 2012-06-18. 
  4. ^ a b "Nolan, Richard Michael". Minnesota Legislators Past & Present. Retrieved 2012-06-18. 
  5. ^ a b "Nolan, Richard Michael". Minnesota Legislators Past & Present. Retrieved 2013-12-13. 
  6. ^ "Five Democrats May Endorse Ted Kennedy". The Virgin Islands Daily News. May 23, 1979. 
  7. ^ Kady II, Martin (January 4, 2008). "Dodd, Biden drop out after Iowa defeat". Politico. Retrieved 2012-06-18. 
  8. ^ "Mission Township, MN". Missiontownship.org. Retrieved 2013-12-13. 
  9. ^ Collins, Jon (July 13, 2011). "Former Rep. Nolan enter 8th District race against Cravaack". Minnesota Independent. Retrieved 2012-06-18. 
  10. ^ Richert, Catharine (May 11, 2012). "Nolan invites Cravaack to fishing opener". Minnesota Public Radio. Retrieved 2012-06-18. 
  11. ^ Collins, Jon (August 15, 2012). "Nolan wins in 8th; Quist wins in 1st". Minnesota Public Radio. 
  12. ^ Mitchell, Corey (3-26-2014). "Mills moves up in Republican "Young Guns" program". Star Tribune. Retrieved 27 March 2014. 
  13. ^ Nather, David (12-26-2013). "Ads hit vulnerable Dems on Obamacare". Politico. Retrieved 27 March 2014. 
  14. ^ “Nolan gives views on current legislation,” The Paynesville Press, October 9, 1975.
  15. ^ "Nolan responds to Cravaak's statements". Brainerd Dispatch. August 17, 2012. 
  16. ^ "Nolan, Cravaack spar over economy in final debate". Duluth News Tribune. November 1, 2012. 
  17. ^ "Cravaack, Nolan wrangle over health care in debate". Brainerd Dispatch. October 16, 2012. Retrieved 2013-12-13. 
  18. ^ Henry, Devin (2013-06-05). "Nolan's 'protest' vote one of four against VA budget bill". MinnPost. Retrieved 2013-12-13. 
  19. ^ a b "Cravaack, Nolan Battle over Natural Resources." MinnPost, n.d.
  20. ^ Zara, Christopher (October 1, 2013). "Government Shutdown 2013: Bill To Stop Congress From Getting Paid Introduced By Rep. Rick Nolan". International Business Times. 
  21. ^ "Seniority List of the US House 113th Congress" (PDF). Clerk of the House of Representatives. January 22, 2013. Retrieved 2013-12-13. 
  22. ^ a b "Committees and Caucuses | Congressman Rick Nolan". Nolan.house.gov. Retrieved 2013-12-13. 
  23. ^ Office of the Historian, House of Representatives. "Committees in the U.S. Congress 1947-1992", Volume 2: Committee Histories and Member Assignments, by Garrison Nelson, University of Vermont with Mary T. Mitchell, University of Michigan, Clark H. Bensen, PoliData. Published by the Congressional Quarterly, page 665.
  24. ^ Office of the Historian, House of Representatives. "Encyclopedia of the United States Congress", c. 1995, volume 4, pages 1795 & 1799
  25. ^ Mitchell, Corey (November 17, 2012). "Rep.-elect Nolan takes a trip back to the future". Star Tribune. Retrieved 2013-12-13. 
  26. ^ Zdechlik, Mark (November 12, 2012). "Nolan embraces role as 'veteran freshman' in Congress". MPR News. Retrieved 2013-12-13. 
  27. ^ "Results from Congressional District 08". Minnesota Secretary of State. November 9, 2012. Retrieved November 9, 2012. 

External links[edit]

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
John Zwach
U.S. Representative from Minnesota's 6th congressional district
1975 – 1981
Succeeded by
Vin Weber
Preceded by
Chip Cravaack
U.S. Representative from Minnesota's 8th congressional district
2013 –
Succeeded by
Incumbent
United States order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
Marcia Fudge
D-Ohio
United States Representatives by seniority
235th
Succeeded by
Matt Salmon
R-Arizona