Ricky Ian Gordon

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Ricky Ian Gordon
Ricky Ian Gordon publicity shot.jpg
Ricky Ian Gordon
Background information
Birth name Ricky Ian Gordon
Born (1956-05-15) May 15, 1956 (age 57)
Oceanside, New York, United States
Origin United States New York City, United States
Genres Musical theatre, Opera
Occupations Composer, lyricist
Years active 1956–present
Website www.rickyiangordon.com

Ricky Ian Gordon (born May 15, 1956) is an American composer of songs, stage musicals and opera.

Life[edit]

Gordon was born in Oceanside, New York. He was raised by his mother, Eve, and father, Sam, and he grew up on Long Island with his three sisters, Susan, Lorraine and Sheila. Donald Katz based his book, Home Fires: An Intimate Portrait of One Middle-Class Family in Postwar America, on Gordon's family life.[1] Gordon attended Carnegie Mellon University.

Work[edit]

The death of his lover from AIDS inspired Dream True (1998), Orpheus and Euridice (2005) and the song cycle Green Sneakers for Baritone, String Quartet, Empty Chair and Piano (2007). He has composed several operas and had his music performed by Audra McDonald, Dawn Upshaw, Renée Fleming, Todd Palmer and others.[2][3]

In 1992 Gordon set ten of Langston Hughes's poems to music for Harolyn Blackwell.[4] In February 2007, Gordon's opera, The Grapes of Wrath, premiered in Saint Paul, Minnesota. The opera was co-commissioned and co-produced by the Minnesota Opera and the Utah Symphony & Opera. In 2011 he wrote the music for Rappahannock County, a staged revue of twenty one songs about the Civil War, commissioned by the Virginia Arts Festival.[5]

Assessment[edit]

Gordon's songwriting is steeped in the traditions of cabaret and musical theater, while his choice of themes has been idiosyncratic.[6] Green Sneakers for Baritone, String Quartet, Empty Chair and Piano has been described as "a significant contribution to the culture sprung from the AIDS crisis", notable for its elegiac quality as well as its restraint.[7] His opera The Grapes of Wrath, based on the novel by John Steinbeck, has been cited for achieving "instant success that is rare for an American opera."[8]

References[edit]

External links[edit]