Right-wing politics and violence

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Right-wing politics and violence refers to radical and populist elements associated with violent acts against civilians and government employees. In certain instances, perpetrators may have been influenced by right-wing literature, while in others, they may have been exposed to media outlets espousing right-wing political views and commentators whose rhetoric has been implicated in influencing members of their audience to commit violent acts. According to political scientist George Michael at The University of Virginia's College at Wise, "right-wing terrorism and violence has a long history in America".[1]:114

Right-wing extremist incidents of violence began to outnumber Marxist-related incidents in the United States during the 1980s and 1990s.[2]:29 Michael observes the waning of left-wing terrorism as right-wing terrorism and violence takes its place, with a noticeable "convergence" of the goals of militant Islam with those of the extreme right. Islamic studies scholar Youssef M. Choueiri of the University of Manchester classifies Islamic fundamentalist movements involving revivalism, reformism, and radicalism within the scope of "right-wing politics".[3]:9

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Michael, George. 2003. Confronting Right-Wing Extremism and Terrorism in the USA. Routledge. ISBN 0-415-31500-X.
  2. ^ International Foundation for Protection Officers. 2003. The Protection Officer Training Manual. Butterworth-Heinemann. ISBN 0-750-67456-3.
  3. ^ Choueiri, Youssef M. 2010. Islamic Fundamentalism: The Story of Islamist Movements. Continuum International Publishing Group. ISBN 0-826-49801-9.

References[edit]

  • Atkins, Stephen E. 2004. Encyclopedia of Modern Worldwide Extremists and Extremist Groups. Greenwood Publishing Group. ISBN 0-313-32485-9.
  • Goldwag, Arthur. 2012. The New Hate: A History of Fear and Loathing on the Populist Right. Pantheon Books. ISBN 0-307-37969-8. OCLC 724650284
  • Jones, Mark; Johnstone, Peter. 2011. History of Criminal Justice. Elsevier. ISBN 1-437-73497-9.
  • Mahan, Sue; Griset, Pamala L. 2007. Terrorism in Perspective. SAGE. ISBN 1-412-95015-5.
  • Martin, Gus. 2012. Understanding Terrorism: Challenges, Perspectives, and Issues. SAGE. ISBN 1-452-20582-5.
  • Michael, George. 2010. The Enemy of My Enemy: The Alarming Convergence of Militant Islam and the Extreme Right. University Press of Kansas. ISBN 0-700-61444-3. OCLC 62593627