Right iliac fossa

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Right iliac fossa (RIF) is an anatomical term that refers to the right-inferior part of the surface of the human abdomen. It is a way of localising pain and tenderness, scars and lumps.

The right iliac fossa is a common site of pain and tenderness in patients who have appendicitis.

The fossa is named for the iliac fossa of the hip bone, and thus is somewhat imprecise. Most of the anatomical structures that will produce pain and tenderness in this region are not in fact in the concavity of the ileum. However, the term is in common usage.

The right illiac fossa is a common location for kidney transplantation. The native kidneys are usually left in place while the transplanted kidney is placed in the RIF. Blood supply to the new kidney is established by anastomosing the donor renal artery to the external illiac artery. Similarly, the donor renal vein is anastomosed to the recipient external illiac vein. In massive splenomegaly the spleen projects towards the right iliac fossa.