Quadrant (anatomy)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Right upper quadrant (abdomen))
Jump to: navigation, search
A Graphic showing Contents of Quadrant (anatomy)

The human abdomen is divided into quadrants by doctors to localise pain and tenderness, scars, lumps and other items of interest. The quadrants are referred to as the left lower quadrant, left upper quadrant, right upper quadrant and right lower quadrant.

The left lower quadrant (LLQ) of the human abdomen is the area left of the midline and below the umbilicus. The LLQ includes the left iliac fossa and half of the left flank region.

The term is not used in comparative anatomy, since most other animals do not stand erect. The equivalent term for animals is left posterior quadrant.

The left upper quadrant (LUQ) extends from the median plane to the left of the patient, and from the umbilical plane to the left ribcage.

The equivalent term for animals is 'left anterior quadrant'.

The right upper quadrant (RUQ) extends from the median plane to the right of the patient, and from the umbilical plane to the right ribcage.

The equivalent term for animals is 'right anterior quadrant'.

The right lower quadrant (RLQ) extends from the median plane to the right of the patient, and from the umbilical plane to the right inguinal ligament.

The equivalent term for animals is 'right posterior quadrant'.

Important organs[edit]

Of LLQ: Include part of the descending colon, sigmoid colon, left ovary and Fallopian tube or left uterine tube.

Of LUQ:

Of RUQ:

Of RLQ:

Clinical significance[edit]

In the LLQ if abdominal pain or signs of peritonitis are localised, colitis, diverticulitis, ureteral colic or pain due to ovarian cysts or pelvic inflammatory disease, may be suspected. Examples of tumours in the left lower quadrant include colon cancer or ovarian tumour.

The LUQ may be painful or tender in appendicitis, and in the case of intestinal malrotation.

The RUQ may be painful or tender in hepatitis, cholecystitis, and peptic ulcer.

The RLQ may be painful and/or tender in such conditions as appendicitis.

Differential diagnosis[edit]

In children:

In adults:

In elderly:


See also[edit]