Risa Wataya

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Risa Wataya (綿矢 りさ Wataya Risa?, born February 1, 1984) is a female Japanese novelist from Kyoto.

Life[edit]

Wataya graduated from Murasakino High School in Kyoto.

Her first novella, Install, written when she was 17, was awarded the 38th Bungei Prize.[1]

She graduated from Waseda University in Tokyo. Her thesis focused on the structure of Osamu Dazai's Hashire merosu (走れ、メロス Run, Melos!).[2]

Wataya rose to fame in 2003 upon receiving the Akutagawa Prize for her short novel Keritai Senaka ("The Back You Want to Kick"), while at Waseda University. The prize was shared between Wataya and Hitomi Kanehara, another young, female author. At the age of 19, Wataya became the youngest author—and the third student—ever to receive this greatly prestigious award, the first two student winners having been Shintarō Ishihara and Keiichiro Hirano.

Wataya's works have been translated into German, Italian, French, Thai and Korean.

In 2004, her novel Install was adapted into a film starring Aya Ueto.

In 2012, her novel Kawaisou da ne? ("Isn't it a pity?") won the Kenzaburo Oe Prize, meaning that the novel will be translated into English and other languages.[3]

Works[edit]

  • インストール (Install). Kawade Shobo Shinsha Publishing Co., 2001. ISBN 4-309-01437-2
  • 蹴りたい背中 (Keritai senaka, "The Back I Want to Kick"). Kawade Shobo Shinsha Publishing Co., 2003. ISBN 4-309-01570-0
  • 夢を与える (Yume wo ataeru, "To Give a Dream"). Kawade Shobo Shinsha Publishing Co., 2007.ISBN 978-4309018041
  • 勝手にふるえてろ (Katte ni furuetero, "Tremble All You Want"). Bungeishunju Ltd.,2010. ISBN 978-4-16-329640-1
  • かわいそうだね? (Kawaisou da ne?, "Isn't It a Pity?"). Bungeishunju Ltd.,2010. ISBN 978-4-16-380950-2

References[edit]

  1. ^ Student Affairs Division. "People : "You can keep it" — her first novel since winning the Akutagawa Prize.". Waseda Weekly. Waseda University. Retrieved 12 April 2012. 
  2. ^ Student Affairs Division. "People : "You can keep it" — her first novel since winning the Akutagawa Prize.". Waseda Weekly. Waseda University. Retrieved 12 April 2012. 
  3. ^ Mainichi Shinbun. "Novelist Wataya wins Kenzaburo Oe Prize after long drought". Mainichi Shinbun. Retrieved 12 April 2012. 

External links[edit]