Rishabhdeo

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Rishabhdeo
ऋषभदेव
Rikhabdeo
city
Rishabhdeo is located in Rajasthan
Rishabhdeo
Rishabhdeo
Location in Rajasthan, India
Coordinates: 24°06′N 73°24′E / 24.10°N 73.40°E / 24.10; 73.40Coordinates: 24°06′N 73°24′E / 24.10°N 73.40°E / 24.10; 73.40
Country  India
State Rajasthan
District Udaipur
Population (2001)
 • Total 8,023
Languages
 • Official Hindi
Time zone IST (UTC+5:30)
PIN 313802
Telephone code 02907

Rikhabdeo (aka Dhulev) is a census town in Udaipur district in the state of Rajasthan, in north-west India.

Rishabhadeo is situated 65 kilometres (40 mi) from Udaipur and is on Udaipur-Ahmedabad Road. The name of the town is also Dhulev (धुलेव), however it is better known as Rishabhadeo. It is a well-known pilgrim site. The main attraction is the temple of Rishabhadeoji, the first Jain tirthankara. Local Bhils also worship the deity. Lord Rishabhadeo is also "Kesariaji" because a large offering of saffron (keshar, a common ingredient in Jain rituals) is made to the deity.

This temple was considered to be one of the four main religious institutions of Mewar, ruled by the Sisodia Maharanas of Udaipur,[1] as stated by Chatur Singhji Bavji:

"Ekling Girirajdhar Rishabdev Bhujchaar
 Sumaron Sada Sneh so, Chaar Dham Mewar"

It has been a famous Jain pilgrimage center. The famous Arati by Mulchand refers to this temple:[2]

"Dusari Aarti Din Dayala,
 Dhuleva Nagarman Jug Ujavala"

The main idols in the temple[edit]

The main idol of this temple is Lord Rishabh Dev, carved in black stone in padmasana posture, about 3.5 feet (1.1 m) tall. Two oxen are carved in the center of the simhasana (platform) of the main idol, which also has 16 dreams of the mother of Tirthankar. Surrounding the main deity, there are 23 idols, 2 standing and 21 seated, in an ashtadhatu (composed of eight metals) parikar. Here, pilgrims are bound to be lost in unstinted devotion; both Jain and non-Jain visitors and pilgrims experience a sort of sacredness, thanks due to the simply indescribable aura of the image of Shri Prabhu. The round face of Shri Prabhu is extremely attractive and pleasing to the mind. The whole temple, with the main inner apartment, the deep pandal, nine chowkis, the assembly pandal, the Bhamati, the small shrines of gods, the Shrungara chowki, the peak and the encircling fort is simply majestic. Even from a distance, the gorgeous 52 Jinalayas can enrapture the viewer. In the north and south sides of the Khela Mandapa of the temple, idols of Tirthankaras Vasupujya, Mallinath, Neminath, Parshvanath and Mahavir Swami (collectively referred to as Panch-Balayati) are installed.[3]

There are 52 secondary ornate shrines (devakulikas) of the Tirthankaras.

Elephants carved of black stone stand at the entrance of the temple. On the north is the image of Goddess Chakreshvari, and on the southern side is an image of goddess Padmavati.

The structure and architecture, of idols and temple, show clearly that it is a Jain temple, but since all Hindu castes and Jain sects have been offering prayers here since a long time ago, the management of the temple is done by the state Government.

History and Now[edit]

The history of Kesariyaji Temple is not ever known clearly. Different different communities puts their own ideas for the temple. So it would be controversial to say about Temple's history.

The only we can say is that the temple was beautifully architectured before 15th century.

The Aarti offered to the Lord Rishabhdev is " jai jai Aarti aadi jinanda..." This aarti is the same which is being offered in all the Jain Shwetambar Derasar.

Jay jay arati aadi jinanda, naabhiraya maroodevi ko nanda, Jay jay arati...

Pehli arati puja kije, nar bhav paami ne laho leeje;

Jay jay arati aadi jinanda, naabhiraya maroodevi ko nanda, Jay jay arati...


Dusri arati din dayala, dhuleva mandal me jag ajuwala,

Jay jay arati aadi jinanda, naabhiraya maroodevi ko nanda, Jay jay arati...


Teesri aarti tribhuvan deva, sur nar indra kare tari seva,

Jay jay arati aadi jinanda, naabhiraya maroodevi ko nanda, Jay jay arati...


Chauthi arati chaugati chure, man vanchith fal shiva sukh pure,

Jay jay arati aadi jinanda, naabhiraya maroodevi ko nanda, Jay jay arati...


Panchmi aarti punya upaya, mulchande rushabh guna gaaya


Jay jay arati aadi jinanda, naabhiraya maroodevi ko nanda...(2)

The "Vakshshep puja", "Navangi Kesar Puja" "Prabhu aangi" and many more rituals are done in the same way as the Jain Shwtambars do. Even all the priests of temple follow the Jain Shwetambar rituals.

In the great majority only Jain Shwetambar Sanghs comes here from all over the India.

The temple and the Maharanas of Udaipur[edit]

Udaipur became the capital of the Sisodias in 1559. The revival of the fortunes of the Sisodias was made possible by the Jain ministers, like Bhamashah, who provided funds to reestablish the Maharanas after they had to leave Chittor. Because of significant Jain influence, the Maharanas became devotees of Lord Rishabh and worshipped here. They also made gifts to the temple.

Maharana Fateh Singh (1884–1930) presented a jewel-studded angi (coat) to the temple which is used on special occasions costing one hundred thousand rupees.[4]

The administration was handed over to the government after India's independence.

The temple dispute[edit]

The nature of the temple has been in issue between Digambers, Swetambers and other Hindus. However, the Supreme Court of India in its judgment delivered in 'The State of Rajasthan & Ors. Vs. Shri Sajjanlal Panjawat & Ors.' [reported as (1974) 1 SCC 500] has, after considering the material produced, decided that it is a 'Jain temple' [see para. 12 at pg. 509/510 SCC]. However, since the right to manage the said temple had been taken over by the State of Mewar before promulgation of the Indian Constitution, therefore, Jains had no right to manage the temple after the Indian Constitution came into force. For that reason, it was held, that the Jains had no right to protect under Article 25/26 of the Indian Constitution. The issue of management of the said tample was again cropped up, and Digambers, Swetambers, Hindus and the State of Rajasthan again brought the matter in the Supreme Court of India, claiming to have the right to manage the temple. However, this time on the strength of 'Rajasthan Public Trust Act', which says that those temples to which chapter X of the said Act is applicable, would be managed by a Committee constituted from the persons interested in the management. That case was decided by a Bench of the Indian Supreme Court and Hon'ble Justice S.B. Sinha and Hon'ble Justice Markandey Katju vide in the judgment dated 4 January 2007, delivered in Civil Appeal No.4092-95 of 2002 titled as "Deewan Singh & Ors. vs. Rajendra Prasad ARdevi & Ors". Other connected Civil Appeals, confirmed the judgment of Single Judge (which was modified by the Division Bench of the Rajasthan High Court) and ordered that the management of the said temple be handed over to the committee, as envisaged under Section 53 of the 'Rajasthan Public Trust Act' within four months.

A 2007 Supreme Court decision to hand over the administration to the Jain community[5] had led to protests and violence by the local tribals.[6][7] Frontline reported that:[8]

"The revenue earned by the temple was also perhaps the main issue behind the legal tangle and the current confrontation, in which tribal people have been used as cannon fodder. The temple complex lies on 378 hectares of land and houses a guest house as well. Its moveable property alone is said to be valued at about Rs. 510 million. It is estimated that on an average 2,000 devotees visit Rishabdeo every day.
"The temple's eight Brahmin priests share the bulk of the offerings.
"The priests insist that the management cannot be handed over to the Jain community. "Where will we go? The Maharanas of Mewar gave us the right to conduct prayers here. They also made valuable offerings to the god," says Bhogilal, a priest. "I won't let the mandir go either to the Devasthan or to the tribals," he says."

Gulabchand Kataria, the home minister of Rajasthan believes that the tribals were incited by some elements.[9] Dainik Navjyoti[10] had reported on 14 February 2007 that:

"Some members of the Jain community say that some leaders of the vaishnava community are behind instigation of the tribals."
"The priests get a large fraction of all the offerings. Because of this selfish interest, the group of priests do not want the management to go to the Jains."

Bhaskar reported the anonymous pamphlets were distributed among the tribals to incite them.[11] The violence had erupted on 7 February 2007, when the tribal leaders had declared a "Mahapadav". Several hundred tribals attacked the members of the Jain community and destroyed theirs shops, houses, cars, etc. The police were unable to contain the destruction even after the use of tear gas and rubber bullets. One person was killed in the police firing.

There is pressure being put on the state government not to implement the Supreme Court decision.[12] This has been causing alarm in the Jain community.

Demographics[edit]

As of 2001 India census,[13] Rikhabdeo had a population of 8023. Males constituted 52% of the population, and females 48%. Rikhabdeo has an average literacy rate of 76%, higher than the national average of 59.5%: male literacy is 82%, and female literacy is 70%. In Rikhabdeo, 14% of the population is under 6 years of age. Right now around 500 students are going outside of Rishbhdeo for higher education, such as MBBS, BTech, B.Com., C.A. and many courses.

About half the residents of the town are Jain, 95% belonging to the Digambara, and another half are Brahmin, suthar, lohar, tailor, mochi, kumhar, somupura and other casts are here from many years ago. Shwetambar jains are also residing here. The history of temple actually rovolving arround Shwetambar jains and Digambar jains. Many Shwetambar jains now left the town but the Shwetambar community contributed great in town development. Many bhil and meena villages are surrounding Rishabhdeo, and they have come every day to Rishbhdeo for prayer, in sects[14] belonging to Bispanthi Narsingpura and Humad communities.

Rishabhdeo is also famous for green marble. It has more than 300 marble mines in massaor ki obri and odavas kagder. About 90% percent of the green marble around the world is produced by Rishabhdeo. Nearly 70% percent of the marble of Rishabhdeo is exported to the USA, UAE, Canada and many other countries.

Picture gallery[edit]

Gaj Mandir[edit]

Gaj Mandir is a Jain Shwetambar Temple built in 2011 in Rishabhdeo. The place is well known for the Kika Bhai Dharmshala. The management of Kika bhai dharmshala is under Kikabhai Premchand Trust and purely owned by Jain Shwetambar community.

Other local attractions[edit]

Nearby places worth visiting include: Paglyaji, Rishabh Garden, Patshala Jain temple, Ram Mandir, Emliyachod Hanuman ji, Chandragiri, Bhim Pagalya, Bhattarak Kirti Bhavan, Dadabadi, Peepli temple and vaghuvan.

See also[edit]

References[edit]