River Dove, North Yorkshire

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River Dove
Farndale daffs on Easter Saturday 2007 - geograph.org.uk - 391928.jpg
The River Dove near Farndale
Origin

Farndale Moor, Nth Yorkshire

54°24′24″N 1°2′23″W / 54.40667°N 1.03972°W / 54.40667; -1.03972
Mouth

River Rye near Salton

54°12′6″N 0°54′35″W / 54.20167°N 0.90972°W / 54.20167; -0.90972
Basin countries England
Length 30.22 kilometres (18.78 mi)
Source elevation 372 metres (1,220 ft)
Mouth elevation 24 metres (79 ft)
Basin area 59.2 square kilometres (22.9 sq mi)

Coordinates: 54°21′22″N 0°57′43″W / 54.356°N 0.962°W / 54.356; -0.962 The River Dove is a river in North Yorkshire, England. It rises on the North York Moors and flows south to join the River Rye, itself a tributary of the River Derwent. The upper valley of the river is known as Farndale. The name is of Brittonic Celtic origin, meaning "dark river".[1]

Course[edit]

The river flows through Farndale south-east past several small settlements to Church Houses. Here it turns south and continues meandering past Low Mill to Lowna. At Gillamoor it heads south-east again past Hutton-le-Hole before returning southwards past Ravenswick and to the east of Kirkbymoorside. It continues past Keldholme and Kikrby Mills to Great Edstone. From there it flows south south-east to where it joins the River Rye in the Vale of Pickering near the village of Salton.

The Environment Agency have a gauging station at Kirby Mills where the average low river level is 0.2 metres (0.66 ft) and the high river level 0.52 metres (1.7 ft) with a record high level of 2.45 metres (8.0 ft). The record high level shows the river can be susceptible to flooding.[2]

Geography[edit]

Both the River Dove and Hodge Beck are partly swallowed by the local limestone aquifer and issue again further down the valley. During summer months the bed of Hodge Beck often runs dry. The soil in the valley floor is loam over clay. The bedrock is Jurassic limestone with some sandstone.[3]

Leisure[edit]

Between Church Houses and Low Mill in Farndale, the River Dove is popular with walkers due to its picturesque setting. The banks of the river are known for their wild daffodils which are rumoured to have been planted by monks from nearby Rievaulx Abbey. Along this part of the valley is The Farndale Daffodil Walk, an 11.4-kilometre (7.1 mi) circular walk starting at Lowna Bridge.[4][5]

In Literature[edit]

William Wordsworth's poem, She dwelt among the untrodden ways from the Lucy series of poems refers to the eponymous Lucy living close to the "springs of Dove", a reference to the source of the river.[citation needed]

Lists[edit]

Gallery[edit]

Sources[edit]

  • Ordnance Survey Explorer Map OL26
  • Google Earth

References[edit]

  1. ^ Watts, Victor, ed. (2010), "Dove", The Cambridge Dictionary of English Place-Names, Cambridge University Press 
  2. ^ "River Levels". Environment Agency River and Sea Levels. Retrieved 28 August 2011. 
  3. ^ "Geology". Retrieved 28 August 2011. 
  4. ^ "Walking". Retrieved 28 August 2011. 
  5. ^ "Farndale daffodils". Retrieved 28 August 2011. 

External links[edit]