Riverton, New Jersey

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Riverton, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Riverton
Riverton highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Riverton highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Riverton, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Riverton, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°00′43″N 75°00′53″W / 40.011932°N 75.014735°W / 40.011932; -75.014735Coordinates: 40°00′43″N 75°00′53″W / 40.011932°N 75.014735°W / 40.011932; -75.014735[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Burlington
Incorporated December 18, 1893
Government[5]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor William C. Brown (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Clerk Mary Longbottom[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 0.966 sq mi (2.502 km2)
 • Land 0.665 sq mi (1.722 km2)
 • Water 0.301 sq mi (0.780 km2)  31.17%
Area rank 505th of 566 in state
37th of 40 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 13 ft (4 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 2,779
 • Estimate (2012[10]) 2,794
 • Rank 458th of 566 in state
33rd of 40 in county[11]
 • Density 4,179.4/sq mi (1,613.7/km2)
 • Density rank 144th of 566 in state
5th of 40 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 08076-08077[12][13]
Area code(s) 856 exchanges: 303, 786, 829[14]
FIPS code 3400563660[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0885373[17][2]
Website www.riverton-nj.com

Riverton is a borough located in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough had a total population of 2,779,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 20 (+0.7%) from the 2,759 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 16 (-0.6%) from the 2,775 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Riverton was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on December 18, 1893, from portions of Cinnaminson Township, based on the results of a referendum held six days earlier. Portions of the borough were taken to form Palmyra Township on April 19, 1894.[19] It is a dry town, where alcohol cannot be sold.[20][21]

The borough is located on the Delaware River and is pedestrian-friendly, with sidewalks, gas lamps, and Victorian architecture. Riverton is home to the Riverton Yacht Club, one of the oldest and still active yacht clubs in the country.[22] Many residents' sailboats make their home at this landmark.

Geography[edit]

Riverton is located at 40°00′43″N 75°00′53″W / 40.011932°N 75.014735°W / 40.011932; -75.014735 (40.011932,-75.014735). Riverton is too boss for Palmyra. According to the United States Census Bureau, Riverton borough had a total area of 0.966 square miles (2.502 km2), of which, 0.665 square miles (1.722 km2) of it was land and 0.301 square miles (0.780 km2) of it (31.17%) was water.[2][1]

The borough borders Cinnaminson Township, Palmyra, and the Delaware River.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1890 1,075
1900 1,332 * 23.9%
1910 1,778 33.5%
1920 2,341 31.7%
1930 2,483 6.1%
1940 2,354 −5.2%
1950 2,761 17.3%
1960 3,324 20.4%
1970 3,412 2.6%
1980 3,068 −10.1%
1990 2,775 −9.6%
2000 2,759 −0.6%
2010 2,779 0.7%
Est. 2012 2,794 [10] 0.5%
Population sources:
1890-2000[23] 1890-1920[24]
1890-1910[25] 1910-1930[26]
1930-1990[27] 2000[28][29] 2010[7][8][9]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[19]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 2,779 people, 1,057 households, and 754.7 families residing in the borough. The population density was 4,179.4 per square mile (1,613.7 /km2). There were 1,112 housing units at an average density of 1,672.3 per square mile (645.7 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 93.41% (2,596) White, 3.31% (92) Black or African American, 0.11% (3) Native American, 0.76% (21) Asian, 0.07% (2) Pacific Islander, 0.47% (13) from other races, and 1.87% (52) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 2.02% (56) of the population.[7]

There were 1,057 households, of which 29.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.6% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.6% were non-families. 23.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.00.[7]

In the borough, 21.4% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.7% from 18 to 24, 23.0% from 25 to 44, 31.0% from 45 to 64, and 17.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44.2 years. For every 100 females there were 91.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.7 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $94,762 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,688) and the median family income was $112,721 (+/- $9,113). Males had a median income of $81,078 (+/- $9,544) versus $50,517 (+/- $6,553) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $47,945 (+/- $4,715). About 3.4% of families and 4.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.4% of those under age 18 and 2.4% of those age 65 or over.[30]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 2,759 people, 1,066 households, and 746 families residing in the borough. The population density was 4,205.1 people per square mile (1,614.0/km2). There were 1,113 housing units at an average density of 1,696.4 per square mile (651.1/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 95.83% White, 1.78% African American, 0.11% Native American, 0.83% Asian, 0.00% Pacific Islander, 0.29% from other races, and 1.16% from two or more races. 1.09% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.[28][29]

There were 1,066 households out of which 30.7% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.7% were married couples living together, 8.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.0% were non-families. Another 25.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 3.00.[28][29]

In the borough the population was spread out with 21.8% under the age of 18, 4.3% from 18 to 24, 29.8% from 25 to 44, 24.8% from 45 to 64, and 19.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 90.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.8 males.[28][29]

The median income for a household in the borough was $58,977, and the median income for a family was $68,125. Males had a median income of $50,950 versus $36,042 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $30,223. 3.1% of the population and 2.0% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 4.5% of those under the age of 18 and 2.4% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line.[28][29]

History[edit]

Riverton Yacht Club House c 1894

Riverton was established in 1851, along the Delaware River, having been laid out by Philadelphia architect Samuel Sloan. According to architectural historian Henry Russell Hitchcock, Riverton was the first totally planned residential subdivision in America.[31]

In 1916, Japanese beetles, now a widespread insect pest in the United States, were first discovered in a nursery near Riverton.[32]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Riverton is governed under the borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council made up of six council members, with all positions elected at large in partisan elections. A mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The borough council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[5]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Riverton is Republican William C. Brown, Jr., whose term of office ends December 31, 2015. Members of the Riverton Borough Council are Council President Suzanne Cairns Wells (R, 2013), Renee Azelby (R, 2015), Joseph Creighton (R, 2014), William Corbi (2015), Michael H. Kinzler (R, 2014) and Jeff Myers (R, 2013).[4][33][34][35][36]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Riverton is located in the 3rd Congressional District[37] and is part of New Jersey's 7th state legislative district.[8][38][39] Prior to the 2010 Census, Riverton had been part of the 1st Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[40]

New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District is represented by Jon Runyan (R, Mount Laurel Township).[41] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[42][43] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[44][45]

The 7th district of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Diane Allen (R, Edgewater Park Township) and in the General Assembly by Herb Conaway (D, Delanco Township) and Troy Singleton (D, Palmyra).[46] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[47] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[48]

Burlington County is governed by a Board of chosen freeholders, whose five members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year.[49] The board choose a director and deputy director from among its seven members at an annual reorganization meeting held in January.[49] As of 2013, Burlington County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Joseph B. Donnelly (R, 2013; Cinnaminson Township),[50] Deputy Director Leah Arter (R, 2014; Moorestown Township),[51] Aimee Belgard (D, 2015; Edgewater Park Township),[52] Joseph Howarth (R, 2014; Evesham Township)[53] and Joanne Schwartz (D, 2015; Southampton Township).[54][49]

Education[edit]

The Riverton School District serves students in public school in pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade. Riverton Elementary School served 271 students as of the 2010-11 school year.[55]

For grades nine through twelve, public school students attend Palmyra High School as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Palmyra Public Schools, along with students from Beverly.[56][57]

Students from Riverton, and from all of Burlington County, are eligible to attend the Burlington County Institute of Technology, a countywide public school district that serves the vocational and technical education needs of students at the high school and post-secondary level at its campuses in Medford and Westampton Township.[58]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The borough had a total of 14.05 miles (22.61 km) of roadways, of which 12.42 miles (19.99 km) are maintained by the municipality and 1.63 miles (2.62 km) by Burlington County.[59]

Public transportation[edit]

The Riverton station is located on Main Street,[60] provides service on the River Line light rail system, offering southbound service to Camden and the Walter Rand Transportation Center with connections to PATCO Speedline trains to Philadelphia and the Camden County suburbs and northbound service to the Trenton Rail Station with connections to New Jersey Transit trains to New York City, SEPTA trains to Philadelphia and Amtrak trains.[61]

New Jersey Transit provides bus service in the borough on the 419 route that runs between Camden and Burlington.[62][63]

BurLink bus service is offered on the B8 route between the Riverside station and Hartford Crossing / Delran Township.[64]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Riverton include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ a b Riverton Borough Council, Riverton Borough. Accessed December 1, 2013.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 38.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Riverton, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 11, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Riverton borough, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 4. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Riverton borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 9, 2013.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Riverton, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Riverton, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  19. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 99. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  20. ^ New Jersey Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control. New Jersey ABC list of dry towns (May 1, 2013)
  21. ^ Giordano, Rita. "More towns catching liquor-license buzz; Moorestown considers ending its dry spell", The Philadelphia Inquirer, June 24, 2007. Accessed February 16, 2014.
  22. ^ Americas's Oldest Yacht ClubsIn Order of Year, YachtClub.com. Accessed August 9, 2013.
  23. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Burlington County Municipalities, 1800 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed December 1, 2013.
  24. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed August 7, 2013.
  25. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 335. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  26. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 715. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  27. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of August 30, 2012.
  28. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Riverton borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  29. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Riverton borough, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  30. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Riverton borough, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  31. ^ Pearsall, Richard. "Riverton: From a summer retreat to year-round town", Courier-Post, October 8, 2006. Accessed August 9, 2013. "Thus emerged, on farmland purchased from Joseph Lippincott, one of the first planned, suburban towns in the country."
  32. ^ Emergency and Domestic Programs: Japanese Beetle, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. Accessed December 7, 2006.
  33. ^ 2013 Municipal Data Sheet, Riverton Borough. Accessed December 1, 2013.
  34. ^ November 6, 2012 Summary Report Burlington County Amended Official Results, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed December 1, 2013.
  35. ^ November 8, 2011 Summary Report Burlington County Official Results, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed December 1, 2013.
  36. ^ 2010 Certified Burlington Co. General Election Winners, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed December 1, 2013.
  37. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  38. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 63, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  39. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  40. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 63, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  41. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  42. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  43. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  44. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  45. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  46. ^ Legislative Roster 2012-2013 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 11, 2012.
  47. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  48. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  49. ^ a b c Staff. Meet the Freeholders, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed November 27, 2013.
  50. ^ Joseph B. Donnelly, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  51. ^ Leah Arter, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  52. ^ Aimee Belgard, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed November 27, 2013.
  53. ^ Joseph Howarth, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  54. ^ Joanne Schwartz, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed November 27, 2013.
  55. ^ Data for the Riverton School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed July 18, 2013.
  56. ^ High School Sending Districts, Burlington County Library System, backed up by the Internet Archive as of September 27, 2006. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  57. ^ Hefler, Jan. "Riverton Considers Breaking Ties With Palmyra Schools", The Philadelphia Inquirer, January 17, 1990. Accessed December 1, 2013. "Riverton voters will be asked to decide in an April referendum whether they want to spend money on a study that could be the first step in breaking ties between the Riverton and Palmyra School Districts.... Riverton, which has only an elementary school program, sends 51 children to neighboring Palmyra High School, which has 350 students."
  58. ^ Why Choose BCIT?, Burlington County Institute of Technology. Accessed December 1, 2013.
  59. ^ Burlington County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed December 1, 2013.
  60. ^ Riverton station, New Jersey Transit. Accessed December 1, 2013.
  61. ^ River LINE System Map, New Jersey Transit. Accessed December 1, 2013.
  62. ^ Burlington County Bus/Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of January 28, 2010. Accessed November 30, 2013.
  63. ^ South Jersey Transit Guide, Cross County Connection, as of April 1, 2010. Accessed December 1, 2013.
  64. ^ BurLink Schedules, Cross County Connection. Accessed December 1, 2013.
  65. ^ Biography, Nat Gertler - Freelance Writer - Comics Guy. Accessed December 1, 2013. "His earlier years were spent in Cinnaminson, NJ; Simsbury, CT; and Riverton, NJ, where he stayed long enough to consider it his hometown."
  66. ^ "LLOYD C. GRISCOM UNDER THE KNIFE; Condition Very Grave Last Night in Philadelphia After an Operation", The New York Times, April 2, 1912. Accessed December 14, 2007. "Lloyd Carpenter Griscom was born in Riverton, N. J., on Nov. 4, 1872."
  67. ^ Tatman, Sandra L. Leavitt, Charles Wellford, Jr. (1871 - 1928) , from American Architects and Buildings at Philadelphia Architects and Buildings. Accessed December 1, 2013. "Born in Riverton, NJ, Charles Wellford Leavitt, Jr., received his early education at the Gunnery in Washington, CT, and at Cheltenham Academy in Cheltenham, PA."
  68. ^ Frank Asbury Mathews, Jr., Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed September 10, 2007.
  69. ^ Vitello, Paul. "Philip E. Slater, Social Critic Who Renounced Academia, Dies at 86", The New York Times, June 29, 2013. Accessed December 1, 2013. "Philip Elliot Slater was born on May 15, 1927, in Riverton, N.J., the youngest of three children of Pauline Holman Slater and John Elliot Slater, a shipping executive."

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Cinnaminson Township
Bordering communities
of Philadelphia
Succeeded by
Palmyra