Rizon

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Rizon
RizonLogo.png
Founded July 2002 (2002-07)
Geographic location Europe
Canada
United States
Asia
Based in Worldwide
Website URL rizon.net
Primary DNS irc.rizon.net
Average users 18,000 – 21,000
Average channels 22,000 – 25,000
Average servers 20
Content/subject Public/Unrestricted

Rizon is a large Internet Relay Chat (IRC) network with an average of around 20,000 users. The IRC network itself ranks number 5 among the largest IRC networks.[1][2] Rizon is popular with many anime fansubbing groups who work online, many of whom provide their content through XDCC via IRC bots in their distribution channels. It is also used by many users of eRepublik as a means of communication.[3] File sharing of other copyrighted material such as Warez is also common in some channels on the network.[4][5][6][7]

Rizon IRCd[edit]

Rizon currently uses Plexus IRCd. Plexus was coded specifically with Rizon in mind and is based on Hybrid IRCd. Plexus is not exclusive to Rizon as the IRCd is also used by other networks. Plexus versions 1.x and 2.x were originally coded by static & peer. Plexus 3.x was rewritten by ThaPrince and is now maintained and developed by the Rizon Dev Team.

As of the r524 release, the ability for automatic services authentication using SSL client certificates has been implemented, and was largely based on the work done by OFTC[citation needed], though significant changes were made regarding server-to-server communication.

Controversy[edit]

DDoS attack against mIRCX[edit]

In early 2004 the mIRCX and Aniverse IRC networks were the victims of Denial-of-service attacks (DDoS) and were forced to shut down temporarily; Aniverse later resumed operations at a greatly reduced capacity. This in turn caused approximately 8,000-10,000 IRC users of various anime fansubbing channels to migrate to Rizon. Rizon was forced to increase its number of servers to handle the additional users. This also had the effect of making Rizon a target for DDoS attacks.

Contrary to rumors, Rizon had no part in a DDoS attack against mIRCX in 2004. Richard "Krashed" Roby was the actual perpetrator who initiated the attacks in retaliation against CJB networks for shutting down his botnet.[8] Roby was later raided by the FBI as part of Operation Cyberslam.[9][10] Initial charges brought against Roby as part of Operation Cyberslam were dropped but he later pleaded guilty to lesser charges and was sentenced to an 18-month prison sentence.[11][12][13]

DDoS attacks against rival networks[edit]

On May 25, 2007 as part of Operation: Bot Roast conducted by the FBI, Rizon's founder, Jason Michael Downey aka "Nessun" was charged with using a botnet in 2004 to launch Denial-of-service attacks (DDoS) against other computer networks, including rival IRC networks such as IRCHighway.[14][15][16][17][18]

On June 20 2007, Downey pleaded guilty in a US Federal court to operating a botnet "of up to 6,000 infected computers" and using it to launch DDoS attacks "From on or about June 18, 2004 through on or about September 5, 2004." Downey faced up to 24 months in prison and a fine of up to $40,000.[14]

When asked his reasons behind performing the DDoS attacks, Downey explained to U.S. District Judge Nancy G. Edmunds that "I was doing it because I could, more than anything," and "It was a dumb thing to do."[19]

Downey was sentenced on October 23, 2007 to 12 months in prison for causing over $20,000 in losses and damages due to unlawful computer intrusion and was ordered to pay a total of $21,110 in damages to 3 companies that were affected by his DDoS attacks. After his release, Downey will have a probation term of 3 years with no computer access without prior permission and will have to perform 150 hours of community service.[14][15][20][21][22]

After Downey's sentencing, some of Rizon's users who felt Downey was wrongly accused created an online petition titled "Free Nessun!"[23]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "IRC Networks - Top 100". Retrieved 2011-11-15. 
  2. ^ Piccard, Paul; Baskin, Brian; Edwards, Craig; Spillman, George (2005-05-01). "Internet Relay Chat—Major Players of IRC". In Sachs, Marcus. Securing IM and P2P Applications for the Enterprise. foreword by Kevin Beaver (1st ed.). Rockland, Massachusetts: Syngress Publishing. p. 371. ISBN 978-1-59749-017-7. 
  3. ^ Piccard, Paul; Baskin, Brian; Edwards, Craig; Spillman, George (2005-05-01). "IRC Networks and Security". In Sachs, Marcus. Securing IM and P2P Applications for the Enterprise. foreword by Kevin Beaver (1st ed.). Rockland, Massachusetts: Syngress Publishing. p. 387. ISBN 978-1-59749-017-7. 
  4. ^ Wang, Wallace (2004-10-25). "Instant Messaging and Online Chat Rooms". Steal this File Sharing Book (1st ed.). San Francisco, California: No Starch Press. p. 63. ISBN 978-1-59327-050-6. "Three of the most popular networks used for file trading include Undernet, Rizon, and EFnet." 
  5. ^ Piccard, Paul; Baskin, Brian; Edwards, Craig; Spillman, George (2005-05-01). "Internet Relay Chat—Major Players of IRC". In Sachs, Marcus. Securing IM and P2P Applications for the Enterprise. foreword by Kevin Beaver (1st ed.). Rockland, Massachusetts: Syngress Publishing. p. 372. ISBN 978-1-59749-017-7. 
  6. ^ Office of the United States Trade Representative (2006-04-21). National Trade Estimate Report on Foreign Trade Barriers, 2006 (21st ed.). United States Government Printing Office. p. 256. ISBN 0-16-075976-5. 
  7. ^ Office of the United States Trade Representative (2006-03-31). "National Trade Estimate Report on Foreign Trade Barriers, 2006" (PDF). p. 263. Retrieved 2009-03-07. [dead link]
  8. ^ "Why irc.mircx was shut down". 2004-02-22. Retrieved 2009-03-02. 
  9. ^ Poulsen, Kevin (2004-08-26). "FBI busts alleged DDoS Mafia". SecurityFocus. Retrieved 2009-03-02. 
  10. ^ "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA v. PAUL G. ASHLEY, JONATHAN DAVID HALL, JOSHUA JAMES SCHICHTEL, RICHARD ROBY and LEE GRAHAM WALKER" (PDF). 2004-09-25. Retrieved 2009-03-02. 
  11. ^ Poulsen, Kevin (2005-09-08). "Hackers Admit to Wave of Attacks". Wired News. Retrieved 2009-03-02. 
  12. ^ Brian, Krebs (2006-05-01). "Hired Internet Gun Sentenced to Two Years". Security Fix. Washington Post. Retrieved 2009-03-02. 
  13. ^ "FooNET/HTTPD/CIT updates and information". Retrieved 2009-03-02. 
  14. ^ a b c "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA v. D-1 JASON MICHAEL DOWNEY". 2007-05-25. Retrieved 2009-03-02. 
  15. ^ a b "Nessun Goes to Jail". IRC-Junkie.org. 2007-10-27. Retrieved 2009-03-02. 
  16. ^ FBI National Press Office (2007-06-13). "Over 1 Million Potential Victims of Botnet Cyber Crime". Press Release. Federal Bureau of Investigation. Retrieved 2009-03-02. "Jason Michael Downey of Covington, Kentucky, is charged with an Information with using botnets to send a high volume of traffic to intended recipients to cause damage by impairing the availability of such systems. (FBI Detroit)" [dead link]
  17. ^ O'Brien, Luke (2007-06-13). "FBI Announces Botnet Dragnet". Threat Level. Wired News. Retrieved 2009-03-02. 
  18. ^ Acohido, Byron (2007-06-13). "FBI cracks down on 'bot herders'". USA Today. Retrieved 2009-03-02. 
  19. ^ "Nessun: "Because I Could"". IRC-Junkie.org. 2007-06-26. Retrieved 2009-03-02. 
  20. ^ FBI National Press Office (2007-11-29). ""Bot Roast II" Nets 8 Individuals". Press Release. Federal Bureau of Investigation. Retrieved 2009-03-02. "Downey operated Internet Relay Chat (IRC) network Rizon. Downey stated that most of the attacks he committed were on other IRC networks or on the people that operated them." 
  21. ^ Vamosi, Robert (2007-11-29). "FBI's Operation Bot Roast II nets additional indictments, sentences". CNET News. Retrieved 2009-03-02. 
  22. ^ Brandt, Andrew (2007-12-17). "True crime: The botnet barons". InfoWorld. p. 5. Retrieved 2009-03-02. 
  23. ^ petitiononline.com/e1m2u3s4/petition.html "Free Nessun!". PetitionOnline. Retrieved 2009-03-02. 

External links[edit]