Rob Hornstra

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Rob Hornstra (born 14 March 1975, Borne, Overijssel) is a Dutch photographer and self-publisher of documentary work, particularly of areas of the former Soviet Union.

Career[edit]

Hornstra studied Social and Legal Services at Utrecht University of Applied Sciences from 1994 to 1998; for a year from summer 1996, he interned and then worked as a probation officer. From September 1998, he worked for over eight years as a host and bartender at Muziekcentrum Vredenburg in Utrecht. From 1999 to 2004, he studied photographic design at Utrecht School of the Arts.[1]

For his graduation project he spent one month in Russia photographing the lives of first generation young people growing up after the fall of communism. In the same year as graduation he published this series as his first book, Communism and Cowgirls.

Since graduation Hornstra has combined editorial work for newspapers and magazines with more personal, longer-term documentary work in the Netherlands, Iceland, and the former Soviet Union. Hornstra considers himself a maker of photographic documentaries rather than a photographer; when not photographing for a particular purpose, he does not carry a camera.[2] Further, he sees books as more important than exhibitions, and regards his own editing, publication and marketing of books of his photography as an important part of his work.[2]

Hornstra prefers to work with film, in medium format or large format:

[It] takes me quite a bit of time to set up my Mamiya medium-format camera and Horseman large-format camera. And that allows me to shoot more spontaneous pictures. Yes, it sounds contradictory. But snapshots aren't always so spontaneous by any means. When people have to pose for a long time, they eventually relax. Then you can really take nice pictures of them.[3]

In 2006, together with the art historian Femke Lutgerink, Hornstra started work on Fotodok,[n 1] an Utrecht-based organization that arranges exhibitions and other events for documentary photography. Itself inspired by Fotohof in Salzburg, Fotodok hopes eventually to create an exhibition space for documentary photography in Utrecht. Fotodok was launched in 2008; Hornstra stepped down as creative director in September 2009.[1][3][4]

Starting with his first collection, Communism and Cowgirls, Hornstra has published his own books. These skip forewords by other writers, biographical notes, ISBNs and the other trappings of conventionally published books; by taking advance orders and selling copies directly and also working through a small number of retailers, Hornstra is able to avoid normal distribution channels.[2][5][6]

Together with the writer and filmmaker Arnold van Bruggen, in 2009 Hornstra started the Sochi Project, which over five years would document the area of Sochi (Krasnodar Krai, Russia) and the changes to it during the preparation for the 2014 Winter Olympics.[5] Hornstra and Van Bruggen express surprise that the site chosen for such a large winter event would be one so close to politically volatile areas such as Abkhazia and one that by Russian standards has exceptionally mild winters.[5] Under the slogan slow journalism, the pair request donations from the public for the crowdfunding of a project whose timescale is impossible for the mass media.[6][7] The stories Hornstra and Van Bruggen collected as part of the project have appeared in newspapers, photobooks and online over the course of the five year period. The project culminated in the retrospective book An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus published by Aperture in 2013, and in 2014 an exhibition that toured Europe, America and Canada.

Hornstra and Van Bruggen have also created more democratic exhibitions, made entirely of newsprint, that can be shown on the walls of small galleries with no budget for framed prints or video installations: On the Other Side of the Mountains (2010), two copies of which create an exhibition;[n 2] Paris Photo Newsprint Exhibition (2012), with thirty photographs;[n 3] and three versions of Billboard Sochi Singers, each containing the sheets to assemble either of two posters.[n 4]

Critic Sean O'Hagan, writing in The Guardian, said "Whichever way you look at it, The Sochi Project is an incredible piece of journalism, both visual and written, and a glimpse of the medium's future."[8]

Hornstra is represented by Flatland Gallery (Utrecht and Paris)[9] and was previously represented by the Institute for Artist Management.[10]

Exhibitions[edit]

Solo exhibitions, and pair exhibitions with Arnold van Bruggen[edit]

  • Communism and Cowgirls, Fotohof (other languages), Salzburg, 2005.[11]
  • Communism and Cowgirls, De Balie, Amsterdam, 2006.[12]
  • Roots of the Rúntur, National Museum of Iceland, Reykjavík, 2006.[13]
  • 101 Billionaires and Other Stories, Flatland Gallery, Utrecht, 2009.[14]
  • The Sochi Project, Mandeep Photography, Rome; Spazio Labo' - Centro di Fotografia, Bologna, 2010.[15][16]
  • Views from Sochi. Third Floor Gallery, Cardiff, February–March 2011.[17]
  • Ivan's Cowshed and Putin's Games: A report on the current state of the Sochi Project. Freelens Gallery (other languages), Hamburg, April–May 2011.[18]
  • On the other side of the mountains. International Centre of Photography, Kristiansund, Norway; Nordic Light International Festival of Photography, May 2011.[19]
  • Empty Land, Promised Land, Forbidden Land. Savignano Immagini. Galleria Vicini, Savignano sul Rubicone, September 2011.[20]
  • Empty Land, Promised Land, Forbidden Land. Foto8, London, March–April 2012.[21]
  • Empty Land, Promised Land, Forbidden Land. FEM, HU University of Applied Sciences Utrecht, November–December 2012.[22]
  • The Secret History of Khava Gaisanova & The North Caucasus. Ti Pi Tin, London, May–June 2013.[23]
  • 101 Billionaires and the Sochi Project. Browse Foto-Festival, Berlin, June–July 2013.[24][25][26]
  • The Sochi Project. FotoDoc Center for Documentary Photography, Sakharov Center, Moscow, October 2013.[27][28][29]
  • The Sochi Project. Stadsschouwburg, Amsterdam, October 2013.[28][29][30]
  • The Sochi Project: An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus. FotoMuseum Antwerp, November 2013 – March 2014.[31][32]
  • Gouden Jaren: Rob Hornstra's Rusland / Golden Years: Rob Hornstra's Russia. Huis Marseille (other languages), Amsterdam, December 2013 – March 2014.[33][34]
  • The Sochi Project: An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus. DePaul Art Museum, DePaul University, Chicago, January–March 2014.[35][36]
  • The Sochi Project: An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus. Fotohof, Salzburg, January–March 2014.[37]
  • The Sochi Project: An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus. Noorderlicht, Groningen, April–June 2014.[38]
  • The Sochi Project: An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus. Scotiabank Contact Photography Festival, Toronto, May 2014.[39]
  • Ballets Russes. Flatland Gallery, Amsterdam, May–June 2014.[40]
  • The Sochi Project: An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus. Aperture Foundation, New York City, May–July 2014.[41]
  • The Sochi Project. PhotoIreland Festival, City Assembly House, Dublin, July 2014.[42]

Other exhibitions[edit]

Exhibitions as curator[edit]

Permanent collections[edit]

Publications by Hornstra[edit]

Communism and Cowgirls. Self-published, 2004. On the new, post-Soviet generation of Russians.[n 5]

Rijk: Hoe een ideaal in een kwart eeuw werkelijkheid werd: Stichting de Arm. Utrecht: Autres Directions, 2005. ISBN 90-809681-1-0. By Bram Nijssen; photography by Hornstra. (Dutch) About Stichting de Arm.[n 6]

Changing Faces: Work 1. Photography by Stein and Issa, Orri, Thomas Neumann, Renja Leino, Arturas Valiauga, and Hornstra. Edited by Agnes Matthias. Essen: Museum Volkwang, 2006; Steidl, 2006. ISBN 3-86521-211-5.[77]

Roots of the Rúntur. Rit Thjódhminjasafns Íslands, 10. Reykjavík: Thjódhminjasafn Íslands, 2006. Photography by Hornstra, text by Hornstra and Ingvar Högni Ragnarsson. (English)(Dutch) About what were previously fishing communities in Iceland.[n 7] (Rúntur, literally "round tour", and elsewhere a pub crawl or a drive around a circular course or even repeatedly around a single block, here means a repeated drive around the perimeter road of a village.)

101 Billionaires

101 Billionaires. Utrecht: Borotov Photography, 2008. With text by Hans Loos and Arnold van Bruggen. (English) The title derives from the assertion in the Russian magazine Finans[78] that Russia then had 101 (US dollar) billionaires. However, the book depicts not these Russians but rather those who were "forgotten by capitalism".[n 8] The book was nominated for the New York Photo Awards 2009[79][80] and listed among Photo-Eye's best ten photobooks for 2008.[81]

101 Billionaires, 2nd edition. Utrecht: Borotov Photography, 2009. (English) A cheaper edition (no gatefolds) with slightly updated text, whose publication was prompted by the news that the number of billionaires had plummeted to 49.[82] Referred to by Hornstra[83] and in reviews and notices[84][85] as the 2009 Crisis Edition.

Sanatorium. N.p.: The Sochi Project, 2009. Photography by Hornstra, text by Arnold van Bruggen. The first of a series of annual publications from the Sochi Project, this booklet is about Sanatorium Metallurg at Sochi, which, like the other Soviet-era sanatoria in the area, is likely to be demolished and replaced with an expensive hotel in time for the 2014 Winter Olympics.[n 9] Sanatorium won the "Photographic Book" category of the New York Photo Awards in 2010.[86][87]

Empty Land Promised Land Forbidden Land

Empty Land Promised Land Forbidden Land. N.p.: The Sochi Project, 2010. (English) Photography by Hornstra, text by Arnold van Bruggen. This 271-page book is the second in the series of annual publications of the Sochi Project. A portrait of Abkhazia, and of Abkhazians and Georgians exiled from Abkhazia.[n 10] The book was listed among Photo-Eye's best photobooks for 2010[88] and was nominated for the 2011 Dutch Doc award.[89]

On the Other Side of the Mountains

On the Other Side of the Mountains. N.p.: The Sochi Project, 2010. (English) Photography by Hornstra, text by Arnold van Bruggen. A photograph album on newsprint (tabloid format) about the village of Krasny Vostok, in Karachay–Cherkessia. On p. 63 appear instructions on how to arrange pp. 3–62 of two copies into an exhibition, as was done during the 2010 European Month of Photography. Hornstra and Van Bruggen chose Krasny Vostok, on the other side of the mountains from Sochi, because nothing unusual happens there.[90][n 11]

One Day: Ten Photographers. Heidelberg: Kehrer Verlag, 2011. ISBN 978-3-86828-173-6. A boxed set, edited by Harvey Benge, of ten books of photographs taken on 20 June 2010, each book by one of Jessica Backhaus, Gerry Badger, Benge, John Gossage, Todd Hido, Hornstra, Rinko Kawauchi, Eva Maria Ocherbauer, Martin Parr and Alec Soth.

Safety First. Sketchbook Series. N.p.: The Sochi Project, [2011]. (English) Photography by Hornstra, text by Arnold van Bruggen. Photographs of Grozny, damaged by an X-ray scanner in Grozny.

Sochi Singers. N.p.: The Sochi Project, 2011. (English) Photography by Hornstra, text by Arnold van Bruggen. Singers performing chansons/popsa in the restaurants of Sochi and nearby resorts.

Life Here is Serious. Sketchbook Series. N.p.: The Sochi Project, [2012]. (English) Photography by Hornstra, text by Arnold van Bruggen. Photographs of young wrestlers in Dagestan.[n 12]

Kiev. Sketchbook Series. N.p.: The Sochi Project, [2012]. (English) Photography and short text by Hornstra. Photographs of Sochi and its area, taken with a Kiev 6S camera.[n 13]

The Secret History of Khava Gaisanova: And the North Caucasus. N.p.: The Sochi Project, 2013. (English) Photography by Hornstra, text by Arnold van Bruggen. The story of one resident of Chermen, North Ossetia.

De Geheime Geschiedenis van Khava Gaisanova. N.p.: The Sochi Project, 2013. (Dutch) Dutch-language edition of the above.

An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus. N.p.: The Sochi Project, New York: Aperture, 2013. ISBN 978-1-59711-244-4.[91]

Awards[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The organization always presents its name in full capitals: "FOTODOK".
  2. ^ The Other Side of the Mountains can be viewed here (Issuu).
  3. ^ Paris Photo Newsprint Exhibition is described here in the Indie Photo Library.
  4. ^ A video illustration of how to create a poster is here (Vimeo).
  5. ^ Images from this are available here at Borotov Archive. Accessed 5 January 2011.
  6. ^ For a description, see "Rijk, a company photobook by Rob Hornstra and Bram Nijssen Graphic Design Photography", Bint Photobooks, 26 February 2009. (Dutch) Accessed 4 January 2011.
  7. ^ For sample photographs, see "Project: Roots of the Rúntur, Rob Hornstra", Behind the Scene. Here at the Wayback Machine (archived on 26 August 2011). More images are available here at Borotov Archive. Accessed 4 January 2011.
  8. ^ The phrase is from "Forgotten by capitalism", Design Mind, n.d. (the first of a series of slides that illustrate the book). For an extended sample see Rob Hornstra, "101 Billionaires", Guernica, March 2010. For images see here at Borotov Archive. For an article on the book, partly based on an interview with Hornstra, see Liza de Rijk, "'Ik heb het idee dat iedereen bang is.' Rusland door de camera van Rob Hornstra", Metropolis M, 3 December 2008. (Dutch) See Jeff Ladd's review of 101 Billionaires, 5B4 Photography and Books, 4 December 2008. All accessed 4–5 January 2011.
  9. ^ For a sample, see "Russia's last resort", London Sunday Times Magazine Spectrum, 8 August 2010, pp. 36–37, reproduced here (PDF) at Borotov.com. For more, see here at Borotov Archive. For description/reviews, see Andrew Phelps, "Rob Hornstra: Sanatorium", Buffet, 27 December 2009; and Joerg Colberg, "Review: Sanatorium by Rob Hornstra and Arnold van Bruggen", Conscientious, 4 December 2009; Jeff Ladd, "Sanatorium by Rob Hornstra and Arnold van Bruggen", 5B4 Photography and Books, 31 December 2009. All accessed 4–5 January 2011.
  10. ^ Images of the book are available here at Borotov Archive. For reviews, see "Empty Land, Promised Land, Forbidden Land", Bastard Title, 27 November 2010, here at the Wayback Machine (archived 25 June 2011); Andrew Phelps, "Empty Land, Promised Land, Forbidden Land - Rob Hornstra and Arnold van Bruggen", Buffet, 28 November 2010; Joerg Colberg, "Review: Empty land, Promised land, Forbidden land by Rob Hornstra and Arnold van Bruggen", Conscientious, 3 December 2010. All accessed 4–5 January 2011.
  11. ^ For images, see here at Borotov Archive. For an account of the editing process see Rob Hornstra, "Do it yourself: The making of On the Other Side...", Ahorn Magazine. Accessed 4–5 January 2011.
  12. ^ Short video of the book here.
  13. ^ This particular model of Kiev, in Cyrillic script "Киев-6C", is shown and described here.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Profile (public), linkedin.com. (English) Accessed 4 January 2011.
  2. ^ a b c Joerg Colberg, "A conversation with Rob Hornstra", Conscientious, 10 November 2008. Accessed 4 January 2011.
  3. ^ a b Daniëlle Arets, "Deep Focus: Rob Hornstra, Roots of the Rúntur", Behind the Scene. (English) Here at the Wayback Machine (archived on 5 September 2011).
  4. ^ Fotodok. (English) Accessed 4 January 2011.
  5. ^ a b c Olivier Laurent, "Do it yourself", British Journal of Photography, 31 August 2010. Here at the Wayback Machine (archived 9 September 2010). The page uses Javascript to redirect elsewhere and so should be viewed with Javascript disabled.
  6. ^ a b Johnny Simon, "Bucking the trend: Rob Hornstra finds success publishing photo books", The Photoletariat, 17 May 2010. Here at the Wayback Machine (archived on 22 May 2011; a pop-up makes this easier to read with Javascript disabled).
  7. ^ Reelika Lepp, "'Give us your money' – a new route for investigative journalism?", Media Kritiek, 10 November 2009. Accessed 5 January 2011.
  8. ^ O'Hagan, Sean (12 December 2013). "Olympics city – it's subtropical!". The Guardian. Retrieved 27 June 2014. 
  9. ^ "Rob Hornstra", Flatland Gallery. Accessed on 13 January 2011.
  10. ^ "Rob Hornstra's Biography", Institute for Artist Management. Here at the Wayback Machine (archived on 26 January 2013).
  11. ^ "Communism and Cowgirls", Fotohof. Accessed 4 January 2011.
  12. ^ "Rob Hornstra — Communism and Cowgirls", De Balie, 25 February 2006. Here at the Wayback Machine (archived 27 September 2011). (Dutch)
  13. ^ "Event calendar: What / where / when", What's on in Reykjavík, March 2006 (vol. 23, issue no. 2), pp. 11–12. Available here (PDF) at heimur.is. Accessed 4 January 2011.
  14. ^ Exhibition announcement for 101 Billionaires and Other Stories, Flatland Gallery. (English) Accessed 4 January 2011.
  15. ^ "The Sochi Project goes to Bologna September 21st – October 26th 2010", 3/3 studio di ricerca sull'immagine fotografica, 2010. (English)(Italian) Accessed 22 July 2014.
  16. ^ Exhibition announcement for The Sochi Project, Flatland Gallery. (English) Accessed 4 January 2011.
  17. ^ "'Views from Sochi' by Rob Hornstra", Third Floor Gallery. Accessed 18 June 2014.
  18. ^ Exhibition notice, Freelens Gallery. (German) Accessed 29 July 2011.
  19. ^ "Sochi prosjektet", Nordic Light International Festival of Photography. Here at the Wayback Machine (archived on 5 May 2011).
  20. ^ "SI Fest 2011: Mostre," Savignano Immagini, 2011. (Italian) Here at the Wayback Machine (archived on 14 November 2011).
  21. ^ "Rob Hornstra: Empty Land, Promised Land, Forbidden Land", Foto8, 11 March 2012. Accessed 20 July 2014.
  22. ^ Tirzah Schnater, "Lezing Rob Hornstra", Trajectum, 19 November 2012. (Dutch) Accessed 20 July 2014.
  23. ^ "X|12 Project Launch", Ti Pi Tin, Stoke Newington, London, 28 May 2013. Accessed 22 July 2014.
  24. ^ "Mapping a future for photojournalism", Browse Foto-Festival, 27 May 2013. Accessed 22 June 2014.
  25. ^ "101 Billionaires", Browse Foto-Festival. Accessed 22 June 2014.
  26. ^ "The Sochi Project", Browse Foto-Festival. Accessed 22 June 2014.
  27. ^ Christopher Brennan, "Denied Visas, Sochi Project Makes Debut", Moscow Times, 21 October 2013. Accessed 22 June 2014.
  28. ^ a b "'The Sochi Project': Amsterdam-Moskou", Nederland-Ruslandjaar. (Dutch) Accessed 22 June 2014.
  29. ^ a b Ymke Frijters, "'The Sochi Project' toch tentoongesteld in Moskou", Digifoto Pro, 17 October 2013. (Dutch) Accessed 22 June 2014.
  30. ^ "The Sochi Project", Stadsschouwburg. (Dutch) Accessed 22 June 2014.
  31. ^ Genevieve Fussell, "The Sochi Project", New Yorker, 25 November 2013. Accessed 22 June 2014.
  32. ^ "The Sochi Project: An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus: Rob Hornstra en Arnold Van Bruggen", within "Exhibition", Provincie Antwerp.[dead link]
  33. ^ "Golden Years / Rob Hornstra's Russia", Huis Marseille. Accessed 23 June 2014.
  34. ^ "Gouden jaren. Rob Hornstra's Rusland", Huis Marseille. (Dutch) Accessed 23 June 2014.
  35. ^ "The Sochi Project: An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus", DePaul University. Accessed 22 June 2014.
  36. ^ Paul Biasco, "The Sochi Project Displays Troubling Side of Olympic City at DePaul Museum", DNA Info, 17 January 2014. Accessed 22 June 2014.
  37. ^ "Rob Hornstra and Arnold van Bruggen: The Sochi Project: An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus", Fotohof. Accessed 23 June 2014.
  38. ^ "Rob Hornstra and Arnold van Bruggen: The Sochi Project: An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus", Noorderlicht. Accessed 24 June 2014.
  39. ^ "The Sochi Project: An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus: Rob Hornstra, Arnold van Bruggen", Scotiabank Contact Photography Festival. Accessed 24 June 2014.
  40. ^ "Women and Work: Rob Hornstra", Flatland Gallery. (Dutch) Accessed 24 June 2014.
  41. ^ "The Sochi Project: An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus", Aperture Foundation. Accessed 25 June 2014.
  42. ^ "The Sochi Project", PhotoIreland Festival. Accessed 31 July 2014.
  43. ^ Press release for Changing Faces: Work (PDF), Gomma. Accessed 4 January 2011.
  44. ^ "List of Hornstra's exhibitions. Photography-now.com. Accessed 22 June 2014.
  45. ^ "Close encounters", MySouthEnd.com, 4 April 2007.
  46. ^ "Photography Meets Industry", GD4PhotoArt. Here at the Wayback Machine (archived on 1 October 2010).
  47. ^ Exhibition announcement for 101 Billionaires, Flatland Gallery. (English) Accessed 4 January 2011.
  48. ^ Rebecca Robertson, "Silverstein Photography Annual", Art News, November 2008. Accessed 4 January 2011.
  49. ^ "Exhibition coincides with new network opening", Sunderland Echo, 21 September 2009. Accessed 22 June 2014.
  50. ^ Arno Haijtema, "Slachtoffers heeft de kredietcrisis genoeg, dus ook in Rusland", De Volkskrant, 16 May 2009, p. 38. (Dutch) Available here (PDF) at Flatland Gallery. Accessed 4 January 2011.
  51. ^ Exhibition notice for Hornstra, Flatland Gallery. (English) Accessed 4 January 2011.
  52. ^ Exhibition announcement for The Brown Room, Flatland Gallery. (English) Accessed 4 January 2011.
  53. ^ Press release for Flatland at Madridfoto, Flatland Gallery. (English) Accessed 4 January 2011.
  54. ^ "Prix de Rome", I amsterdam, 2009. Here at the Wayback Machine (archived 9 May 2009).
  55. ^ Exhibition notice for the acquisitions show, Artslant Paris, 2009. Accessed 4 January 2011.
  56. ^ Exhibition notice for the acquisitions show, Flatland Gallery. (English) Accessed 4 January 2011.
  57. ^ Exhibition notice for Quick Scan NL#01, Nederlands Fotomuseum. (English) Here at the Wayback Machine (archived on 9 March 2012).
  58. ^ Exhibition notice for Art Amsterdam 2010, Flatland Gallery. (English) Accessed 4 January 2011.
  59. ^ Exhibition announcement for On the Other Side of the Mountains, Flatland Gallery. (English) Accessed 4 January 2011.
  60. ^ Detailed exhibition announcement for Berlin, Flatland Gallery. (English) Accessed 4 January 2011.
  61. ^ Exhibition list, MUSA. (English) Here at the Wayback Machine (archived 6 July 2011).
  62. ^ Mutations III, European Month of Photography. (English) Accessed 30 July 2011.
  63. ^ "Public Images, Private Views", CarréRotondes. Accessed 18 June 2014.
  64. ^ Exhibition schedule, Nordic Light; here (PDF) at the Wayback Machine (archived 11 February 2012). (English)
  65. ^ Exhibition notice for In Your Face, Flatland Gallery. (English) Accessed 4 January 2011.
  66. ^ Nomination page (English), Dutch Doc Days / Dutch Doc Award. Accessed 30 July 2011.
  67. ^ News page (Dutch), Dutch Doc Days / Dutch Doc Award. Accessed 30 July 2011.
  68. ^ "Opening Dutch Doc Award exhibition 20 May", Raoul Kramer's website, 25 May 2011. Accessed 19 June 2014.
  69. ^ "Inside: Rob Hornstra and Florian van Roekel: How any story should ultimately be told", Flatland Gallery, Utrecht. Accessed 18 June 2014.
  70. ^ "Paris Photo", Flatland Gallery. Accessed 22 June 2014.
  71. ^ "Program", Twente Biënnale. Accessed 22 June 2014.
  72. ^ "The best travel photography at Cortona on the Move 2014 – in pictures", The Guardian. Accessed 29 July 2014.
  73. ^ "Cortona On The Move 2014 - in pictures", The Daily Telegraph. Accessed 29 July 2014.
  74. ^ "Fotografia 2011: Motherland", Punctum Press. Accessed 20 June 2014.
  75. ^ "Saul Leiter, Mohamed Bourouissa, Rob Hornstra, Christoph Draeger, Masao Yamamoto, Marie Bovo et Marion Tampon-Lajariette: Acquisitions et donations récentes: Collection de la Maison européenne de la photographie", "Photo | Agenda", paris-art.com, [2009]. (French) Accessed 4 January 2011.
  76. ^ Hornstra's CV, Flatland Gallery. (English) Accessed 13 January 2011.
  77. ^ "Books published by the photography department", University of Sunderland. Accessed 31 July 2011.
  78. ^ As reported in Felix Lowe, "Deripaska eclipses Abramovich in rich list", The Telegraph (London), 18 February 2008. Accessed 1 January 2011.
  79. ^ "New York Photo Awards 2009 nominees", Lightstalkers. Accessed 22 June 2014.
  80. ^ "Presentazione e booksigning del nuovo libro fotografico di The Sochi Project, Rob Hornstra, Arnold van Bruggen: Empty land, Promised land, Forbidden land" (PDF), treterzi.org. (Italian) Accessed 22 June 2014.
  81. ^ "Best photobooks of 2008", Photo-Eye, accessed 4 January 2011.
  82. ^ As reported in Dmitry Zhdannikov, "Russia billionaires' league halves in year — Finans", Forbes, 13 February 2009. Here at the Wayback Machine (archived on 19 March 2009).
  83. ^ "101 Billionaires (2009 Crisis Edition)", borotov.com. Accessed 3 March 2011.
  84. ^ Jörg Colberg, "101 49 Billionaires", Conscientious, 13 July 2009. Accessed 3 March 2011.
  85. ^ "101 Billionaires (2009 Crisis Edition) Rob Hornstra Photography", BINT, 1 May 2009. Accessed 3 March 2011.
  86. ^ "Award Winners: Presenting the Winners & Honorable Mentions of The New York Photo Awards 2010", New York Photo Festival. Archived by the Wayback Machine on 8 February 2011.
  87. ^ "Nederlands duo wint New York Photo Book Award 2010", Fotografie.nl, 17 May 2010. (Dutch) Accessed 13 January 2011.
  88. ^ "The best books of 2010: Empty Land", Photo-Eye, accessed 13 January 2011.
  89. ^ "Rob Hornstra & Arnold van Bruggen: The Sochi Project (2011)", Dutch Documentary Photo Foundation. Accessed 18 June 2014.
  90. ^ Rob Hornstra and Arnold van Bruggen, "The Sochi Project: On the Other Side of the Mountains", Mutations III, European Month of Photography. Accessed 4 January 2011.
  91. ^ http://www.aperture.org/shop/books/the-sochi-project-rob-hornstra-books
  92. ^ "Canon feliciteert winnaar Zilveren Camera 2010", Canon. (Dutch) Accessed 20 June 2014.
  93. ^ "Zilveren Camera 2010: Alle genomineerden en winnaars", Fotomuseum den Haag, 27 February 2011. (Dutch) Accessed 20 June 2014.
  94. ^ "2011 Competition Results", Magnum Photos.
  95. ^ "Winners of Sony World Photography awards 2012 – in pictures", The Guardian. Accessed 19 June 2014.
  96. ^ "Sony World Photo Awards 2012", BBC News. Accessed 19 June 2014.
  97. ^ "2012, Arts and Entertainment, 1st prize stories, Rob Hornstra", World Press Photo.
  98. ^ "Sochi Singers", The Independent.
  99. ^ "Canon prijs: Arnold van Bruggen en Rob Hornstra", Zilveren Camera. (Dutch) Accessed 20 June 2014.
  100. ^ "Ilvy Njiokiktjien wint de Zilveren Camera 2013", Opium op Oerol. (Dutch) Accessed 20 June 2014.
  101. ^ "Rob Hornstra & Arnold van Bruggen beloond voor moed en ambitie". Dutch Documentary Photo Foundation. 10 June 2014. Retrieved 11 June 2014. 

External links[edit]