Rob Morrison

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For other people named Robert Morrison, see Robert Morrison (disambiguation).
Rob Morrison
Occupation Journalist
Years active Since early 1990s
Spouse(s) Ashley Morrison
Children 1

Rob Morrison is an American television journalist and news anchor.

Career[edit]

Morrison began his broadcasting career as a combat correspondent while serving in the U.S. Marine Corps.[1] He was a radio disc jockey and news anchor and reporter while stationed on Okinawa, Japan, in the early 1990s.[1] As a civilian, Morrison began his career at WGMC-TV in Worcester, Massachusetts.[1] He later worked at WWLP-TV in Springfield, Massachusetts, and in Hartford, Connecticut.[1] As a foreign correspondent, he reported from Iraq and Qatar during the Second Gulf War; Afghanistan, where he embedded with the Marines during Operation Enduring Freedom in 2001; and Haiti.[2]

In 1999, Morrison began a nine-year period at WNBC, the New York City, flagship station of the NBC broadcast-television network.[1] There he co-anchored Today in New York and Weekend Today in New York, the station's early-morning, local-news-and-entertainment television program.[1] In 2001, Morrison moved to the station's weekend-evening newscasts.

In 2004, he was made a co-anchor of the weekday edition of Today in New York, alongside Darlene Rodriguez, and stayed in that position until 2008 when he left the station. During Morrison's time with WNBC, he also served as a correspondent for NBC News, as well as a news reader for Weekend Today, also an early-morning, news-and-entertainment television program and a production of NBC News.

After leaving WNBC and NBC, Morrison wrote a blog, Daddy Diaries – Confessions of a Stay-at-Home Anchorman, which was published on The Huffington Post, a news website and content-aggregating blog.

In 2009, he joined WCBS, a local broadcast-television station also located in New York City – and the flagship station of the CBS broadcast-television network – where Morrison has anchored the station's morning and evening weekend newscasts.[1] On December 20, 2010, he was named co-anchor, with Mary Calvi, of the weekday editions of CBS 2 News This Morning, the station's early-morning news program, and on newscasts beginning January 3, 2011.[1][3]

On February 20, 2013, Morrison resigned from his $300,000-a-year[4] position at WCBS-TV.[5]

Personal life[edit]

His wife, Ashley Morrison (née Risk),[6] a business anchor for CBS MoneyWatch, was an anchor and reporter with Bloomberg Television from 2007 to 2009.[7] In 2011,[8] the couple and their son, Jack,[7] moved from Manhattan[2] to Darien, Connecticut.[8]


Domestic violence[edit]

In 2009, New York City police had arrested Morrison for allegedly assaulting his wife while the couple lived in Manhattan.[5] Darien police had been called to their Connecticut home on October 17, 2011, arresting Morrison for disorderly conduct in an incident involving his wife, and responded to another domestic disturbance there on January 19, 2013.[5]

Morrison was arrested in his home at approximately 1:30 a.m. Sunday, February 17, 2013, and charged with second-degree strangulation, second-degree threatening and disorderly conduct for allegedly choking his wife.[7] The following day he posted a $100,000 bond and entered no plea in court,[7][9][10] where Judge Kenneth Povodator defined a protective order against him, forbidding contact with his wife and to remain 100 yards away from her.[7] Morrison was next scheduled to appear in court on March 26, 2013.[9] On July 3, 2013, Morrison pleaded guilty to threatening and breach of peace charges, but still faced a strangulation charge that would be dropped if Morrison completes two family-violence programs.[11][12]


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "WCBS Ups Rob Morrison to WCBS Co-Anchor". TVNewsCheck.com. December 20, 2010. Archived from the original on 20 February 2013. Retrieved 20 February 2013. 
  2. ^ a b "Rob Morrison". WCBS. Undated. Archived from the original on January 20, 2013. Retrieved December 28, 2010. 
  3. ^ Huff, Richard (December 21, 2010). "Rob Morrison Will Step In as Morning Co-Anchor of 'CBS 2 This Morning,' Replacing Maurice DuBois". Daily News (New York City). Archived from the original on October 26, 2012. Retrieved December 28, 2010. 
  4. ^ Garvey, Marianne; Beekman, Daniel; McShane, Larry (20 February 2013). "Rob Morrison quits WCBS-TV anchor gig after arrest for choking wife; sources claims the abusive newsman was about to be fired and that marital infidelities led to his 2008 ouster from NBC". Daily News (New York City). 
  5. ^ a b c Mangan, Dan (20 February 2013). "CBS anchor Rob Morrison resigns after allegedly choking wife in Conn. home". New York Post. Retrieved 20 February 2013. 
  6. ^ Paddock, Barry; Beekman, Dan; Parascandola, Rocco; McShane, Larry (February 20, 2013). "WCBS-TV newsman Rob Morrison tells cops 'he would kill' his wife once they turned him loose following domestic call he blames squarely on his mother-in-law". Daily News (New York City). "Ashley Risk Morrison, and her husband ... Rob Morrison" 
  7. ^ a b c d e Spicer, Megan (February 19, 2013). "Protective order issued against WCBS 2 news anchor". Darien News (Darien, Connecticut). Retrieved February 20, 2013. 
  8. ^ a b Shultz, Susan; DesRoches, David (February 18, 2013). "CBS news anchor arrested for choking wife in Darien". Darien Times. Archived from the original on February 20, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013. 
  9. ^ a b "CBS 2 Anchor Rob Morrison Arrested After Allegedly Fighting With Wife". WCBS-TV. February 18, 2013; updated February 19, 2013. Archived from the original on February 20, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013. 
  10. ^ "NYC News Anchor Resigns After Wife-Choking Arrest". Associated Press. February 20, 2013. Archived from the original on 20 February 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2013. 
  11. ^ "Former New York news anchor pleads guilty". Darien News (Darien, Connecticut). July 3, 2013. Retrieved July 3, 2013. 
  12. ^ "Former WCBS anchor cuts no-jail deal after allegedly choking wife during drunken rage". New York Post. July 3, 2013. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 

External links[edit]