Rob Townsend

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Rob Townsend
Birth name Robert Townsend
Also known as Rob Townsend
Born (1947-07-07) 7 July 1947 (age 67)
Origin British
Genres Rock
Occupations Musician
Instruments Drummer
Years active 1967–present
Labels Arista, Polydor, RCA
Associated acts The Blues Band, The Manfreds, Axis Point, Medicine Head, Peter Skellern, George Melly, Bill Wyman.
Notable instruments
DW drums, Ludwig drums

Rob Townsend (born 7 July 1947 in Leicester, England) is a British rock and blues drummer. He was influenced by jazz greats such as Buddy Rich and Gene Krupa and is best known for being the drummer for progressive rock band Family and later The Blues Band.[1]

Rob Townsend (1973)

Biography[edit]

Townsend spent his teenage years playing in various bands in the English town of Leicester, such as the Beatniks, Broodly Hoo and Legay. He became drummer for Family,[2] replacing Harry Overnall in 1967. Family broke up in 1973 and Townsend joined Medicine Head,.[2] After eighteen months he left Medicine Head and spent much of the late 1970s as freelance session drummer for Peter Skellern,[3] George Melly and Bill Wyman amongst others. During this time he played drums for Kevin Ayers,[4] Charlie Whitney's Axis Point[1][5]

In 1979 Townsend joined The Blues Band, in a line up including Paul Jones, guitarists Dave Kelly and Tom McGuinness also bassist Gary Fletcher.[6] He has also appeared with Jones and McGuinness in the Manfred Mann splinter band The Manfreds.

In 2005 Townsend told music journalist Mark Forster:

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Interview with Rob Townsend". mikedolbear.com. 2005. Retrieved 2010-06-24. 
  2. ^ a b Terry Rawlings. Then, now and rare British beat 1960-1969. Omnibus Press. p. 74. 
  3. ^ Mackenzie, Compton Sir and Stone, Christopher. Gramophone, Volume 53. Mackenzie. p. 1258. 
  4. ^ Strong, Martin Charles and Peel, John. The Great Rock Discography. Canongate US. p. 34. 
  5. ^ Larkin, Colin. The Guinness Encyclopedia of Popular Music. Guinness. p. 293. 
  6. ^ Terry Rawlings. Rough Guide to Rock. Rough Guides. p. 360. 

Further reading[edit]

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