Robbinsville Township, New Jersey

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Robbinsville Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Robbinsville
Robbinsville Township highlighted in Mercer County. Inset map: Mercer County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Robbinsville Township highlighted in Mercer County. Inset map: Mercer County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Washington Township, Mercer County, New Jersey (currently known as Robbinsville Township)
Census Bureau map of Washington Township, Mercer County, New Jersey (currently known as Robbinsville Township)
Coordinates: 40°13′29″N 74°35′38″W / 40.224723°N 74.594025°W / 40.224723; -74.594025Coordinates: 40°13′29″N 74°35′38″W / 40.224723°N 74.594025°W / 40.224723; -74.594025[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Mercer
Incorporated March 15, 1859, as Washington Township
Renamed January 1, 2008, as Robbinsville Township
Government[6][7]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)
 • Mayor David Fried (term ends June 30, 2013)[3]
 • Administrator Joy Tozzi[4]
 • Clerk Michele Seigfried[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 20.491 sq mi (53.072 km2)
 • Land 20.316 sq mi (52.618 km2)
 • Water 0.175 sq mi (0.454 km2)  0.86%
Area rank 139th of 566 in state
5th of 13 in county[2]
Elevation[8] 121 ft (37 m)
Population (2010 Census)[9][10][11]
 • Total 13,642
 • Estimate (2012[12]) 13,936
 • Rank 181st of 566 in state
9th of 13 in county[13]
 • Density 671.5/sq mi (259.3/km2)
 • Density rank 417th of 566 in state
12th of 13 in county[13]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08691[14]
Area code(s) 609
FIPS code 3402163850[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0882122[17]
Website http://www.robbinsville-twp.org

Robbinsville Township is a township in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 13,642,[9][10][11] reflecting an increase of 3,367 (+32.8%) from the 10,275 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 4,460 (+76.7%) from the 5,815 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

What is now Robbinsville Township was originally incorporated as Washington Township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 15, 1859, from portions of East Windsor Township.[19] On November 6, 2007, voters approved by a vote of 1,816 to 693[20] a measure that changed the township's name from Washington Township (the name of five other municipalities in New Jersey) to Robbinsville, named after a settlement within the township. The official changeover took place January 1, 2008, as signs and other items with "Washington" on them began to be changed.[21]

Windsor is an unincorporated community located within Robbinsville Township that was founded in 1818 as Centerville.[22]

Geography[edit]

Robbinsville Township is located at 40°13′29″N 74°35′38″W / 40.224723°N 74.594025°W / 40.224723; -74.594025 (40.224723,-74.594025). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 20.491 square miles (53.072 km2), of which, 20.316 square miles (52.618 km2) of it is land and 0.175 square miles (0.454 km2) of it (0.86%) is water.[2][1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 1,279
1870 1,294 1.2%
1880 1,281 −1.0%
1890 1,126 −12.1%
1900 1,157 2.8%
1910 1,090 −5.8%
1920 1,161 6.5%
1930 1,347 16.0%
1940 1,365 1.3%
1950 1,843 35.0%
1960 2,156 17.0%
1970 3,311 53.6%
1980 3,487 5.3%
1990 5,815 66.8%
2000 10,275 76.7%
2010 13,642 32.8%
Est. 2012 13,936 [12] 2.2%
Population sources:
1860-1920[23] 1860-1870[24]
1870[25] 1880-1890[26]
1890-1910[27] 1910-1930[28]
1930-1990[29] 2000[30][31] 2010[9][10][11]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 13,642 people, 5,087 households, and 3,591 families residing in the township. The population density was 671.5 per square mile (259.3 /km2). There were 5,277 housing units at an average density of 259.7 per square mile (100.3 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 81.59% (11,131) White, 3.12% (426) Black or African American, 0.10% (13) Native American, 12.67% (1,729) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.71% (97) from other races, and 1.80% (246) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 4.13% (564) of the population.[9]

There were 5,087 households, of which 41.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.0% were married couples living together, 7.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.4% were non-families. 25.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.26.[9]

In the township, 28.7% of the population were under the age of 18, 4.3% from 18 to 24, 28.4% from 25 to 44, 28.8% from 45 to 64, and 9.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39.2 years. For every 100 females there were 91.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.8 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $92,440 (with a margin of error of +/- $11,773) and the median family income was $124,816 (+/- $10,353). Males had a median income of $96,156 (+/- $4,577) versus $65,327 (+/- $8,597) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $44,149 (+/- $2,813). About 2.7% of families and 3.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.7% of those under age 18 and 4.9% of those age 65 or over.[32]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 10,275 people, 4,074 households, and 2,815 families residing in the township. The population density was 501.8 people per square mile (193.7/km²). There were 4,163 housing units at an average density of 203.3 per square mile (78.5/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 91.00% White, 2.89% African American, 0.14% Native American, 4.31% Asian, 0.55% from other races, and 1.11% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.72% of the population.[30][31]

There were 4,074 households out of which 36.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.8% were married couples living together, 7.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.9% were non-families. 26.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.09.[30][31]

In the township the population was spread out with 26.1% under the age of 18, 3.7% from 18 to 24, 37.9% from 25 to 44, 22.6% from 45 to 64, and 9.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 91.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.7 males.[30][31]

The median income for a household in the township was $71,377, and the median income for a family was $90,878. Males had a median income of $61,589 versus $44,653 for females. The per capita income for the township was $35,529. About 2.5% of families and 3.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.1% of those under age 18 and 5.0% of those age 65 or over.[30][31]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

In November 2004, township residents voted to change their form of government from a Township Committee to a Mayor-Council form under the Faulkner Act. The new form of government took effect as of July 1, 2005.[7][6]

In the new Mayor-Council form of government, the Mayor and Council function as independent branches of government. The Mayor is the Chief Executive of the Township and heads its Administration. The Mayor is elected in a non-partisan election and serves for a four-year term. The Mayor may attend Council meetings but is not obliged to do so.[7]

The Council is the legislative branch. The five members of the Township Council are elected on a non-partisan basis for four-year, staggered terms. At the annual organizational meeting held during the first week of July of each year, the Council elects a President and Vice President to serve for one-year terms. The Council President chairs the meetings of the governing body.[7]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Robbinsville Township is David Fried, whose term of office ends December 31, 2013.[33] Members of the Township Council are Dave Boyne (2015), Vincent J. Calcagno (2013), Christine Ciaccio (2015), Sheree S. McGowan (2013) and Ron Witt (2015).[7][34]

Mayor Fried was re-elected in May 2009, with 64% percent of the vote, while Sheree McGowan and Vince Calcagno were elected to four-year terms on the Township Council.[35] Ron Witt was elected by the council to serve as Council President in 2012.

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Robbinsville Township is located in the 4th Congressional District[36] and is part of New Jersey's 14th state legislative district.[10][37][38] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Robbinsville Township had been in the 30th state legislative district.[39]

New Jersey's Fourth Congressional District is represented by Christopher Smith (R).[40] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[41][42] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[43][44]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 14th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Linda R. Greenstein (D, Plainsboro Township) and in the General Assembly by Daniel R. Benson (D, Hamilton Township, Mercer County) and Wayne DeAngelo (D, Hamilton Township).[45][46] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[47] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[48]

Mercer County is governed by a County Executive who oversees the day-to-day operations of the county and by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders that acts in a legislative capacity, setting policy.[49] As of 2013, the County Executive is Brian M. Hughes (D; term ends December 31, 2013, Princeton).[50] Members of the Board of Chosen Freeholders are elected at-large to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held each January, the board selects a Freeholder Chair and Vice-Chair from among its members.[51] Mercer County's freeholders are Freeholder Chair John Cimino (D; 2014, Hamilton Township)[52], Freeholder Vice Chair Andrew Koontz (D; 2013, Princeton),[53] Ann M. Cannon (D; 2015, East Windsor Township),[54] Anthony P. Carabelli (D; 2013, Trenton),[55] Pasqual "Pat" Colavita, Jr. (D; 2015, Lawrence Township),[56] Samuel T. Frisby (D; 2015; Trenton)[57] and Lucylle R. S. Walter (D; 2014, Ewing Township)[58][59] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Paula Sollami Covello (D, 2015).[60] Sheriff John A. "Jack" Kemler (D, 2014)[61] and Surrogate Dianne Gerofsky (D, 2016).[62][34]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 8,361 registered voters in Robbinsville Township, of which 2,186 (26.1%) were registered as Democrats, 2,068 (24.7%) were registered as Republicans and 4,101 (49.0%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 6 voters registered to other parties.[63]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 51.3% of the vote here (3,406 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 46.7% (3,099 votes) and other candidates with 1.1% (76 votes), among the 6,643 ballots cast by the township's 8,413 registered voters, for a turnout of 79.0%.[64] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 52.9% of the vote here (3,215 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 44.7% (2,718 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (43 votes), among the 6,075 ballots cast by the township's 7,447 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 81.6.[65]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 57.9% of the vote here (2,508 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 34.7% (1,503 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 6.0% (262 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (28 votes), among the 4,331 ballots cast by the township's 8,379 registered voters, yielding a 51.7% turnout.[66]

Education[edit]

The Robbinsville Public School District now serves students in kindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[67]) are Sharon Elementary School[68] (860 students; grades K-3), Windsor Elementary School[69] (enrollment not listed), Pond Road Middle School[70] (1,117; 4-8) and Robbinsville High School[71] (807 in grades 9-12).[72]

Prior to the 2006-07 school year, high school students from here were sent to Lawrence High School in Lawrence Township as part of a now-ended sending/receiving relationship with the Lawrence Township Public Schools. Robbinsville High School serves all of Robbinsville Township's high school students on site and graduated its first class of 150 students in June 2008.[73]

Development[edit]

Robbinsville Town Center, near the intersection of U.S. Route 130 and Route 33, is a mix of about 1,000 housing units, including loft-style condominiums, townhouses, duplexes, single family homes, and real estate space.[74]

Plans are currently underway to redevelop the portion of the township which lies to the south of Route 33, between the Hamilton Township border and U.S. Route 130.[75] In December 2010, the state approved designating this property as an area in need of development, which allows the township to draft a plan and appoint a redeveloper to revive stalled construction projects there.[76]

A proposal to build a large industrial warehouse on Meadowbrook Road has met with opposition from local residents.[77] A lawsuit filed by a resident challenging zoning approvals for the warehouse is currently pending.[78]

A planned Burger King restaurant at the corner of U.S. Route 130 south and Main Street has similarly generated concerns from neighbors.[79]

Robbinsville is home to a large warehouse colony, located on West Manor Way, just adjacent to the entrances and exit ramps to Exit 7 off of Interstate 195. This is home to a variety of companies' distribution centers, including Scholastic Books, JDSU, Sleepy's, and Grainger Products. The Robbinsville Field House is a large membership gym located at the entrance to the warehouse colony near Route 526. As of August 2012, the West Manor Way Bridge, located at the colony's other terminus, is closed for reconstruction.

Transportation[edit]

County routes that pass through include County Route 524, County Route 526 and County Route 539 (Old York Road). Four major U.S./State/Interstate routes pass through the Township: U.S. Route 130, Route 33, Interstate 195 (the Central Jersey Expressway), and the New Jersey Turnpike (Interstate 95).

The Central Jersey Expressway (commonly known as I-195) is a major artery that connects Trenton to "Shore Points" and the New Jersey Turnpike. Interchange 7A (for the Turnpike) is located in the township, with a 10-lane toll gate. 7A is well known for leading to not only Trenton, but to Six Flags Great Adventure in Jackson Township. In addition, Exit 7A is the connector between the free Interstate 295 versus the tolled Turnpike. Trucks and many other vehicles are now beginning to shunpike by using 295 north to 195 east, to the Turnpike northbound (and vice versa). Furthermore, the turnpike interchange gives access to motorists who wish to continue on I-95 (by using I-295) since I-95 (the section north of Trenton) "abruptly" ends in Lawrence Township. (All signage directs drivers wishing to continue on I-95 north to take I-295 south to I-195 east to the Turnpike, I-95 at Exit 7A.)

In November 2006, a bypass of Route was proposed to be constructed near the intersection at CR 526 to the intersection of U.S. Route 130 and Gold Drive in the township of Hamilton.

The New Jersey Turnpike Authority is currently working on a major widening project that would extend the "dual-dual" configuration to Exit 6 (Mansfield Township) from its current southern beginning at Exit 8A (Monroe Township). This would require some extensive construction in the township. The current Exit 7A ramps (for the turnpike access) will be demolished and replaced with new ramp movements: two high speed ramps to the turnpike north and from the turnpike south, and a single lane ramp from the turnpike north and to the turnpike south. The ramps that provide movements to Interstate 195 will be widened to two lanes (from the current single lane). The 7A toll gate will be expanded by constructing three more booths at the toll gate. Also, all the overpasses that cross over and pass underneath the turnpike (especially 195 expressway's overpasses) will be reconstructed. Finally, south barriers will be constructed at various locations along the turnpike. The entire project is slated to be completed by late 2014.

A map of the conflicting area
Proposed Interchange 7A

Due to vehicular noise, residents in the Woods of Washington want sound barriers to be installed along the Turnpike. During peak hours, the decibel levels can reach over 90 (an unacceptable amount which can cause health problems). The residents in this development are situated immediately north of the bridges carrying Interstate 195 over the Turnpike. The sound barriers were constructed in 2011 during the widening between Mansfield Township and Monroe Township.[80]

Robbinsville Township is home to Trenton-Robbinsville Airport (identifier N87), an uncontrolled general aviation airport, with a 4,275-foot (1,303 m) long runway. The airport averages 30,000 aircraft operations per year.[81]

New Jersey Transit provides bus service to and from Trenton on the 606 route.[82]

Wineries[edit]

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Robbinsville Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ Departments/administration.html Administration, Robbinsville Township. Accessed September 12, 2012.
  5. ^ Departments/Municipal Clerk/clerk.html Municipal Clerk, Robbinsville Township. Accessed September 12, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2005, p. 135. Form of government listed as Township.
  7. ^ a b c d e Township Council, Robbinsville Township. August 9, 2013.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Robbinsville, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 11, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Robbinsville township, Mercer County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 12, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 7. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  11. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Robbinsville township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed September 12, 2012.
  12. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 9, 2013.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Robbinsville, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed September 12, 2012.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed September 12, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed September 12, 2012.
  19. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 165. Accessed September 12, 2012.
  20. ^ "A change of name but town's the same", The Trenton Times, November 7, 2007.
  21. ^ 1 Of N.J.'s 6 Washington Townships Changes Name, NBC 10, November 7, 2007. While this and other sources state that the change was immediate, the Township Clerk stated in a phone call that the change would take place on January 1, 2008.
  22. ^ History, Robbinsville Township. Accessed August 9, 2013.
  23. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 18, 2013.
  24. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 276, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed July 18, 2013. "Washington contained in 1860 a population of 1,279; and in 1870, 1,294."
  25. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed November 20, 2012.
  26. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 98. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed September 12, 2012.
  27. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 337. Accessed September 12, 2012.
  28. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 716. Accessed September 12, 2012.
  29. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed September 12, 2012.
  30. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Robbinsville township, Mercer County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 12, 2012.
  31. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Robbinsville township, Mercer County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 12, 2012.
  32. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Robbinsville township, Mercer County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 12, 2012.
  33. ^ Mayor Dave Fried, Robbinsville Township. Accessed August 9, 2013.
  34. ^ a b Elected Officials, p. 15. Mercer County, New Jersey, Revised January 26, 2012. Accessed November 20, 2012.
  35. ^ Municipal Election Preliminary Results, Robbinsville Township, May 12, 2009. Accessed April 18, 2011.
  36. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  37. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 63, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  38. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  39. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 63, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  40. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  41. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  42. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Former Newark Mayor Cory Booker was sworn in as a Democratic senator from New Jersey today, taking the oath of office, exchanging hugs with Vice President Joe Biden and acknowledging the applause of friends and family members seated in the visitor's gallery that rings the chamber.... Booker, 44, was elected to fill out the term of the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who died earlier this year."
  43. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  44. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  45. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 28, 2014.
  46. ^ District 14 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 28, 2014.
  47. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  48. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  49. ^ Elected Officials, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  50. ^ County Executive, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  51. ^ What is a Freeholder?, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  52. ^ John Cimino, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  53. ^ Andrew Koontz, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  54. ^ Ann M. Cannon, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  55. ^ Anthony P. Carabelli, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  56. ^ Pasquale "Pat" Colavita, Jr., Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  57. ^ Samuel T. Frisby, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed August 1, 2011.
  58. ^ Lucylle R. S. Walter, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  59. ^ Meet the Freeholders, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  60. ^ County Clerk, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  61. ^ Meet the Sheriff, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  62. ^ Meet Surrogate Diane Gerofsky, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  63. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Mercer, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed November 21, 2012.
  64. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Mercer County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed November 21, 2012.
  65. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Mercer County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed November 21, 2012.
  66. ^ 2009 Governor: Mercer County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed November 21, 2012.
  67. ^ Data for the Washington Township Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 20, 2012.
  68. ^ Sharon Elementary School, Robbinsville Public School District. Accessed August 9, 2013.
  69. ^ Windsor Elementary School, Robbinsville Public School District. Accessed August 9, 2013.
  70. ^ Pond Road Middle School, Robbinsville Public School District. Accessed August 9, 2013.
  71. ^ Robbinsville High School, Robbinsville Public School District. Accessed August 9, 2013.
  72. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Robbinsville Public School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 9, 2013.
  73. ^ Kahn, Lea. "Lawrence: School district earns $1 million from solar panels", The Lawrence Ledger, March 30, 2011. Accessed April 18, 2011. "School district officials began exploring the possibility of installing solar panels on each of the seven school buildings in 2004, Mr. Meara said. The goal was to address the loss of revenue as a result of Robbinsville Township’s decision to build its own high school, ending the sending-receiving relationship between the Lawrence and Robbinsville school districts."
  74. ^ Robbinsville Town Center, Accessed November 29, 2010.
  75. ^ Preliminary Redevelopment Investigation, Accessed November 29, 2010.
  76. ^ State OKs redevelopment designation for Town Center South, Accessed December 11, 2010.
  77. ^ WiseRatables, Accessed November 29, 2010.
  78. ^ Warehouse plan changes are now purview of courts, zoners say, Accessed December 11, 2010.
  79. ^ Fast-food proposal raises traffic concerns, Accessed December 11, 2010.
  80. ^ Seeking the sound of silence, The Trenton Times, February 4, 2007.
  81. ^ Trenton-Robbinsville Airport, Airnav.com. Accessed April 18, 2011.
  82. ^ Mercer County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed November 20, 2012.
  83. ^ Elijah Cubberley Hutchinson, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed September 7, 2007.

External links[edit]