Robert (P2P Software)

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Robert
Stable release 0.0.37
Written in Python, wxPython
Operating system Cross-platform
Available in English
License Free, open source: GPL
Website inside the I2P network - bob.i2p/Robert.html; using an I2P inproxy - bob.i2p.to/Robert.html

Robert is a file sharing application that relies upon the security and encryption of peers and tunnels inside of I2P. The software uses torrents or a distribution method similar but not compatible to [[magnet:]] links, labeled maggot: links (this is intended as a pun on magnet links). Robert is free and open source and is published by Sponge, an active programmer associated with I2P.[1] New versions are released throughout each month.[2] Robert features a minimalist web browser known as seaweed, intended to allow the safe browsing of eepsites, with any insecure content removed. All connections in Robert are run natively through I2P, so there is no chance of user misconfiguration revealing anything about the user.

Technical design[edit]

Robert has a beta and a stable software package.[3] Robert relies on I2P, Python 2.7.1+, and wxPython 2.8.7.1+.[4] Robert can also interact with Seedless, which is an I2P port of neodatis ODB, ported by sponge. This allows Robert to browse and download torrent files from the seedless database, which is totally decentralised. Seedless can also be used to locate peers, without using either a tracker or DHT. This feature was initially added due to the (then) lack of DHT support in i2psnark.

File sharing[edit]

Robert provides BitTorrent functionality for use within the I2P network. Each peer relies on the user being able to access the I2P network with a web browser to download the .torrent file(s) or maggot: links. Users cannot connect to non-I2P torrents or peers from within I2P, nor can they connect to I2P torrents or peers from outside I2P.[5]

Terminology[edit]

Peers
Other machines using I2P that are connected to each other in the network. Each peer shares the routing and forwarding of encrypted packets.
Tunnels
Every ten minutes, a connection is established between one peer and another. Data to and from peers, along with data for other users, passes through these tunnels, and are forwarded so that the packets eventually reach their final destination.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]