Robert A. Haag

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Robert A. Haag
Born 1956 (1956) (age 58)
Nationality American
Occupation Meteorite hunter
Known for Collecting meteorites

Robert A. Haag (born 1956[1]) is an American famous for collecting meteorites. Some meteorites acquired from Haag are currently on display in the Smithsonian.[1]

Arrest[edit]

Haag has been arrested and jailed in Argentina charged with taking protected rocks (the 37 ton El Chaco meteorite).[2][3] Haag claims he was set up by an Argentinian mineral dealer, who claimed it only belonged to the land owner which Haag was to pay a substantial sum. Haag left the jail and Argentina after paying bail.[4]

Achievements[edit]

Haag was the first private citizen and meteorite hunter to discover a Lunar meteorite,[5][6] known as Calcalong Creek. It was discovered among other meteorites coming out of the Australian Millbillillie meteorite (eucrite achondrite) strewn field. It was bought as a Millbillillie by Haag, but he discovered it was a lunar meteorite. He was also one of the first private citizens to obtain Martian meteorites.

He was featured in a story in Omni Magazine in July 1993.[7][8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Speigel, Elliot Lee (May 29, 2008). "Meteorite Man Seeks Life in Cosmic Rocks". ABC News. Retrieved 2008-11-26. 
  2. ^ Paynter, Ben (January 2007). "The Meteor Farmer". WIRED (51.01): 2 of 3. "The ranks included Robert "Meteorite Man" Haag, once jailed in Argentina for poaching protected rocks..." 
  3. ^ Robert A Haag Biography - NovaSpace Galleries
  4. ^ Norton, O. Richard (1994). Rocks from Space (1st ed.). Mountain Press Publishing Company. p. 297. ISBN 0878423028. 
  5. ^ Norton, O. Richard (1994). Rocks from Space (1st ed.). Mountain Press Publishing Company. p. 300. ISBN 0878423028. 
  6. ^ Greco, JoAnn (June 2007). "Space for Collecting". Art & Antiques. Retrieved 2008-11-26. [dead link]
  7. ^ Smith, Jeff. "Biography of Jeff Smith Lightning photographer". Retrieved 2008-11-26. 
  8. ^ Oberg, James (July 1993). "Rocks for sale". Omni 15 (9): 18. 

External links[edit]