Robert A. Heinlein bibliography

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The science fiction writer Robert A. Heinlein (1907–1988) was productive during a writing career that spanned the last 49 years of his life; the Robert A. Heinlein bibliography includes 32 novels, 59 short stories and 16 collections published during his life. Four films, two TV series, several episodes of a radio series, and a board game derive more or less directly from his work. He wrote a screenplay for one of the films. Heinlein edited an anthology of other writers' SF short stories.

Three non-fiction books and two poems have been published posthumously. One novel has been published posthumously and another, an unusual collaboration, was published in 2006. Four collections have been published posthumously.

Heinlein's fictional works can be found in the library under PS3515.E288, or under Dewey 813.54. Known pseudonyms include Anson MacDonald (7 times), Lyle Monroe (7), John Riverside (1), Caleb Saunders (1), and Simon York (1).[1] All the works originally attributed to MacDonald, Saunders, Riverside and York, and many of the works originally attributed to Lyle Monroe, were later reissued in various Heinlein collections and attributed to Heinlein.

Novels[edit]

Novels marked with an asterisk * are the Scribner's "juvenile" series.

Early Heinlein novels[edit]

Middle Heinlein novels[edit]

Late Heinlein novels[edit]

Early Heinlein works published posthumously[edit]

Short fiction[edit]

"Future History" short fiction[edit]

Other short speculative fiction[edit]

All the works initially attributed to Anson MacDonald, Caleb Saunders, John Riverside and Simon York, and many of the works attributed to Lyle Monroe, were later reissued in various Heinlein collections and attributed to Heinlein.

At Heinlein's insistence, the three Lyle Monroe stories marked with the symbol '§' were never reissued in a Heinlein anthology during his lifetime.

Other short fiction[edit]

Collections[edit]

Complete works[edit]

  • The Heinlein Prize Trust then decided to publish the edition itself, having formed the Virginia Edition Publishing Co. for this purpose. As was true for the Meisha Merlin effort, individual volumes are not offered; subscribers must purchase the entire 46-volume set. The final five volumes (including two volumes of screenwriting, both produced and unproduced) were shipped to subscribers in June 2012.
  • In July 2007, the Heinlein Prize Trust opened the online Heinlein Archives, which allows people to purchase and download items from the Heinlein Archive previously stored at the University of California-Santa Cruz. The Trust makes grants available to those using the archives for scholarly purposes.

Foreword[edit]

Nonfiction[edit]

Filmography[edit]

Spinoffs[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Bill Patterson (2000). "A Study of ‘If This Goes On—’". The Heinlein Journal (7). 
  1. ^ http://www.nitrosyncretic.com/rah/rahfaq.html
  2. ^ "1956 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-03-29. 
  3. ^ "1959 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-03-29. 
  4. ^ "1960 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-03-29. 
  5. ^ "1962 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-03-29. 
  6. ^ "1964 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-03-29. 
  7. ^ "1967 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-03-29. 
  8. ^ "1973 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-05-03. 
  9. ^ "1974 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-03-29. 
  10. ^ "1983 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-03-29. 
  11. ^ "1984 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-05-03. 
  12. ^ "1985 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. Retrieved 2009-03-29. 
  13. ^ http://virginiaedition.blogspot.com/
  14. ^ Encyclopædia Britannica articles: on Paul Dirac and antimatter, and on blood chemistry. A version of the former, titled "Paul Dirac, Antimatter, and You," was published in the anthology Expanded Universe, and demonstrates both Heinlein's skill as a popularizer and his lack of depth in physics; an afterword gives a normalization equation and presents it, incorrectly as being the Dirac equation.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]