Robert Aylett

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Robert Aylett (Aylet) (1583? – 1655) was an English lawyer and religious poet.

Robert Aylett, engraving of 1800 after Thomas Cross.

Life[edit]

He was born in Rivenhall, Essex and was educated at Trinity Hall, Cambridge, graduating B.A. in 1605, M.A. in 1608, and LL.D in 1614.[1] Living at Feering, he acted for the archdeacon of Colchester and as justice of the peace.[2] He also acted in Essex as commissary for the Bishop of London, and judge of the Commissary Court; he played a large part in enforcing the Laudian reforms in the county.[3] He became Master of the Faculties in 1642.[4][5]

Works[edit]

As a poet his work is related to George Herbert's, but he borrowed quite heavily from Edmund Spenser.[6] Susanna, or the Arraignment of the Two Unjust Elders' was published in 1622. Joseph, or Pharaoh's Favorite, Peace with her Four Gardens (1622) and Thrift's Equipage (1622) are other earlier works.[5]

Divine and Moral Speculations (1654)[7] was dedicated to Henry Pierrepont, 1st Marquess of Dorchester and his wife. A Wife not readymade but bespoke, by Dicus the Batchelor, and made up for him by his fellow shepheard Tityrus; in four pastoral eclogues (1653) is a secular piece.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Aylett, Robert (ALT605R)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  2. ^ J. S. Cockburn, Crime in England 1550-1800 (1977), p. 94.
  3. ^ J. Horace Round, William Page, William Price (editor), Family Origins and Other Studies (1971), p. 108.
  4. ^ s:Aylett, Robert (DNB00)
  5. ^ a b Author Record
  6. ^ R. M. Cummings, Edmund Spenser: the critical heritage (1995), p. 140.
  7. ^ Divine and Moral Speculations in Metrical Numbers upon Various Subjects. By Doctor R. Aylet, one of the Masters of the High Court of Chancery. London . . . 1654.

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • John Horace Round, Robert Aylett and Richard Argall. English Historical Review, 38 (1923), 423-4.