Robert B. Dickey

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The Hon.
Robert Barry Dickey
Robert B. Dickey.jpg
Senator for Amherst, Nova Scotia
In office
October 23, 1867 – July 14, 1903
Appointed by Royal Proclamation
Member of the Legislative Council of Nova Scotia
In office
1858–1867
Personal details
Born (1811-11-10)November 10, 1811
Amherst, Nova Scotia
Died July 14, 1903(1903-07-14) (aged 91)
Nationality Canadian
Political party Conservative
Relations Robert McGowan Dickie, father
Children Arthur Rupert Dickey

Robert Barry Dickey (November 10, 1811 – July 14, 1903) was a participant in the conferences leading to the Canadian Confederation of 1867 and is therefore considered to be one of the Fathers of Confederation.[1]

Born in Amherst, the son of Robert McGowan Dickey and Eleanor Chapman,[2] he was educated at Windsor Academy and later studied law with Alexander Stewart. He was called to the Nova Scotia bar in 1834, and to the New Brunswick bar in 1835. He was made a Queen's Counsel in 1863. He served as both judge and registrar of probate in Cumberland County for 20 years. In 1844, he married Mary Blair, one of Alexander Stewart's daughters. Dickey was a director of the Nova Scotia Electric Telegraph Company and consular agent for the United States at Amherst.

From 1858-1867, Dickey was appointed to the Legislative Council of Nova Scotia. In 1867, he was appointed to the Senate of Canada[3] representing the senatorial division of Amherst, Nova Scotia. A Conservative, he served until his death in 1903.

His son Arthur Rupert Dickey served as a member of the House of Commons.

References

  1. ^ "The Fathers of Confederation". www.canadahistory.com. Retrieved October 7, 2013. 
  2. ^ The Canadian biographical dictionary and portrait gallery of eminent and self-made men ... (1881)
  3. ^ "Dickey, Robert Barry National Historic Person". www.pc.gc.ca. March 15, 2012. Retrieved September 28, 2013. 

External links