Robert Brokenshire

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The Honourable
Robert Brokenshire
Robert Brokenshire 2.jpg
Member of the South Australian Legislative Council
Incumbent
Assumed office
24 July 2008
Member of the South Australian Parliament
for Mawson
In office
11 December 1993 – 18 March 2006
Preceded by Susan Lenehan
Succeeded by Leon Bignell
Personal details
Born 1957 (age 56–57)
Nationality Australian Australia
Political party Liberal Party (1993-2006)
Family First (2008-current)
Residence Mount Compass, South Australia
Profession Dairy farmer
Religion Christian
Website Official profile

Robert "Rob" Lawrence Brokenshire (born 1957) is a South Australian dairy farmer and Member of the 48th, 49th, 50th, 51st, 52nd and current South Australian Parliament.[1] Formerly a real estate broker, Brokenshire was a Liberal Party of Australia member of the South Australian House of Assembly between 1993 and 2006, representing the electorate of Mawson. On 24 July 2008 he replaced Andrew Evans as a Family First Party member in the South Australian Legislative Council. The Brokenshire family is of Cornish descent.[2]

Legislative career[edit]

Liberal Party[edit]

Elected in 1993 to the seat of Mawson with the Dean Brown Liberal Party government, he was re-elected in 1997 and 2002.

Brokenshire was promoted to the cabinet in 1998 under the John Olsen government. His roles included Minister for Police, Correctional Services & Emergency Services, Minister for Gambling, Minister for Volunteers, and in opposition, Shadow Minister for Health. Brokenshire served three terms with the Liberal Party.

After losing the seat to Labor at the 2006 election, he was not preselected for Mawson.

Family First Party[edit]

Brokenshire announced in October 2007 that he would contest the Australian House of Representatives seat of Kingston for the Family First Party at the 2007 federal election, but he only achieved a vote of 5.71 percent.[3][4] On 18 March 2008 the Family First Party announced that they had chosen Brokenshire to replace the retiring Andrew Evans in the South Australian Legislative Council.[5] Brokenshire was sworn in for his fourth term in Parliament on 24 July 2008.[6][7]

In 2011, Brokenshire was described as the "de facto opposition leader",[8] and a "terrier".[9] A former cabinet member and minister of police, Brokenshire is admired as the grandfather of South Australian politics, and is sought after for his political analysis.[10][11][12][13][14][15] Brokenshire is a serial user of Freedom of Information.[16][17][18][19][20][21][22][23][24][25][26][27][28][29] Labor MP Jay Weatherill called Brokenshire's use of FOI "completely inappropriate" when he uncovered evidence of cheating at an Adelaide school.[30] Brokenshire said the FOI showed that the NAPLAN testing put too much pressure on schools and teachers to perform, a point on which Weatherill was criticized by the South Australian Education Union on. In one instance, the State’s Chief Information Officer failed to disclose $5,500 in expenses, leading Brokenshire to lodge a complaint with the State's Ombudsman as breach of the FOI Act.[31] Brokenshire was contrasted as being quoted in 19 stories,[8] significantly more than key Liberal figures deputy leader Mitch Williams and Upper House leader David Ridgway.[8] Brokenshire has been praised for attempting feats that neither the government nor opposition would "dare" [32] Brokenshire failed to rule out switching to a Lower House seat.[8]

Brokenshire's appointments include to the Public Works Committee, Select Committee on the Emergency Services Levy, Families SA Committee, Aboriginal Lands Parliamentary Standing Committee, Budget and Finance Committee, Certain Matters Relating to Horse Racing in South Australia, and Natural Resources Committee. Brokenshire also chaired the Taxi Industry in South Australia.[33] In concurrence with the Greens, Brokenshire has opposed the abolition of the Legislative Council.[34] Sharing the balance of power with the Australian Greens, Brokenshire supported green initiatives to force businesses to reduce water consumption[35] (including being critical of the State Government’s failure to meet its voluntary targets[36]), for the federal takeover of the management of the River Murray,[37] for the diversion of the Wivenoe dam to the Murray-Darling basin,[38] and for subsidies for solar panels and electric cars.[39] Brokenshire and Dennis Hood reject such policies as metering and charging for the use of dams collecting rainwater.[40] Brokenshire nevertheless remains a staunch conservative, turning down euthanasia legislation, saying it turns doctors "from life-savers into life-takers".[41] A South Australian dairy farmer, Brokenshire is a fond advocate of funding rural entrepreneurship,[42] rural health,[43] and has suggested recommendations to compel bureaucracy to support community projects.[44] Robert Brokenshire has also encouraged the Government to challenge the status quo, including looking at alternatives such as CSIRO’s invention to make stormwater drinkable, despite the political embarrassment this would cause due to the sunk cost in the desalination plant.[45]

Brokenshire has further pursued his former interest in policing, working with civil rights lawyer George Mancini to increase police transparency to make secret Police Commissioner reports public,[46] increased security guard drug testing,[47] increasing police protection,[48] increasing jail sentence for prison smugglers,[49] increasing police presence,[50] reduce vandalism,[51] building a new police academy at Cheltenham,[52] backing the police in schools program[53] (qualifying that education was "paramount" to a person's future[54]). Brokenshire has also suggested alternative policing strategies, such as a dedicated racing track course for public hoon use.[55] He has criticized the Government's policy for crushing cars as a waste of technology, and suggested more focus on hoon driving licenses.[56]

Since the 2010 election, Brokenshire's second term with Family First has been marked with participation in numerous select committees in Parliament.[57] He has targeted poorly drafted legislation,[58] and recommended limiting the terms of premiers to two parliaments only, mirroring the provision in the US constitution limiting presidents to two terms.[8] Brokenshire has also championed grassroot causes, including housing for the homeless,[59] using the Supreme Court to keep the Government accountable over hospital security,[60] the consultation on the Seaford Heights development,[61] and the Parks Community Center development,[8][62] country hospitals and rights for grandparents. He has also kept the Government accountable over $55,000 a week for damage to government cars,[63] reducing tax-payer-funded ministerial spin doctors,[64] taxpayer-funded projects on schools.[65] reducing the number of cabinet ministers from 15 to 12, which Monsignor David Cappo found would save $30 million.[66] He has called for the proper separation of powers,[8] and remains accountability watchdog on Government affairs.[67] Developing on his election promise to increase funding in mental health, Brokenshire is landmark for original solutions, calling for an independent suicide prevention coordinator.[68] Brokenshire convened the Food Security South Australia group, which comprises peak farming, horticultural and other primary production groups to interact with government and raise the importance of food security in the state.[69] He has positioned himself as a pragmatist, including such policies as scrapping daylight savings, an established tradition, on the basis children are travelling to school in the dark, and are coming home during the hottest time of the day.[70] Brokenshire has also pushed for legislation to allow force of early election by way of 150,000 petitions within a limited duration, in line with his reform to shift power from politicians to people,[71] and to increase pressure on government on non-election periods, in a move backed by Isobel Redmond. His draft proposal of a Parliamentary Act to establish an Independent Commission against Corruption in 2009[72] was also finally accepted by John Rau with a $4 million launch,[73] to be named the Office of Public Integrity.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Profile: Hon Robert Brokenshire". Parliament of South Australia. 
  2. ^ White, G. Pawley, A Handbook of Cornish Surnames.
  3. ^ State elections: ECSA[not specific enough to verify]
  4. ^ Federal elections: AEC[not specific enough to verify]
  5. ^ Family First Press Release[not specific enough to verify]
  6. ^ "New MLC Robert Brokenshire puts major parties on notice". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 24 July 2008. Retrieved 24 July 2008. 
  7. ^ "Ex Lib back in Parliament for Family First" ABC News Online, 24 July 2008 Retrieved on 24 July 2008
  8. ^ a b c d e f g Brad Crouch (3 April 2011). "Is Robert Brokenshire South Australia's defacto Opposition Leader?". Sunday Mail. News Ltd. 
  9. ^ Greg Kelton (7 May 2011). "Kelton: Labor's challenge to get its Upper House in order". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  10. ^ Greg Kelton (5 May 2011). "Wortley's in line for promotion". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  11. ^ "Only one minister left in Upper House after Bernie Finnigan's resignation". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 28 April 2011. 
  12. ^ Lainie Anderson (4 June 2011). "Anderson: Face truth to curb tragic toll". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  13. ^ David Nankervis (15 May 2011). "Crown land 'sale' to boost Budget". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  14. ^ David Nankervis (27 February 2011). "Truancy chronic in many South Australian schools". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  15. ^ David Nankervis (14 May 2011). "Senior public servant treats staff to meals, drinks and health check-ups on taxpayers' tab". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  16. ^ Miles Kemp (1 February 2011). "Violent parents endanger and disrupt schools". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  17. ^ Miles Kemp (8 July 2011). "Schools on alert to media intrusion". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  18. ^ Sharadyn Holderhead (4 July 2011). "Violent parents send fear to school". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  19. ^ David Nankervis (9 July 2011). "Bakewell Bridge speed camera labelled a 'cash cow'". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  20. ^ Miles Kemp (23 July 2010). "Council buries city danger spots". The Advertiser. News Ltd. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  21. ^ Joanna Vaughan (29 June 2009). "Shame of our violent schools revealed". The Advertiser. News Ltd. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  22. ^ Joanna Vaughan (2 October 2009). "Free education fees up". The Advertiser. News Ltd. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  23. ^ Kemp, Miles (20 August 2009). "Schools plead for help to keep truants in class". The Advertiser. News Ltd. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  24. ^ Nankervis, David (17 January 2010). "Adelaide speed cameras in 'wrong spots'". The Advertiser. News Ltd. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  25. ^ Kemp, Miles (17 November 2009). "Parents of truants face $7500 fine". The Advertiser. News Ltd. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  26. ^ Vaughan, Joanna (20 March 2009). "Adelaide families sleeping in cars and sheds". The Advertiser. News Ltd. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  27. ^ Kemp, Miles (14 March 2009). "The PS waiting lounge waste". The Advertiser. News Ltd. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  28. ^ Kemp, Miles (31 March 2009). "Adelaide nightclubs face police blitz for weapons". The Advertiser. News Ltd. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  29. ^ Kemp, Miles (26 July 2010). "Bureaucrats bend truth about school offences". The Advertiser. News Ltd. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  30. ^ Lucy Hood (8 March 2011). "Department withheld extent of NAPLAN bungle". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  31. ^ David Nankervis (28 May 2011). "Public servant food and liquor bill not disclosed". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  32. ^ "Letters: Time to take a united stand". Sunday Mail. News Ltd. 10 April 2011. 
  33. ^ Castello, Renato (18 July 2009). "Catalogue of crime in Adelaide taxi ranks". Sunday Mail. News Ltd. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  34. ^ Kelton, Greg (1 December 2008). "We must keep our democratic watchdog". The Advertiser. News Ltd. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  35. ^ Vaughan, Joanna (2 February 2009). "Family First calls for Government incentives to reduce water use". The Advertiser. News Ltd. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  36. ^ Miles Kemp (13 October 2010). "Industry guzzles water as farms dry out". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  37. ^ Jenkin, Cara (20 August 2009). "Murray protesters gather at Grieger's sand bar". The Advertiser. News Ltd. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  38. ^ Miles Kemp (21 October 2010). "Calls to divert Wivenoe dam water to Murray-Darling Basin". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  39. ^ Wills, Daniel (16 December 2009). "Foley promises Tonsley jobs". The Advertiser. News Ltd. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  40. ^ Bryan Littlely (18 January 2011). "Government rules out rainwater charges". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  41. ^ Sarah Martin (24 November 2010). "No vote as bid for Euthanasia legislation fails". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  42. ^ "Family First calls for $1 billion rural fund". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 11 March 2010. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  43. ^ Tory Shepherd (16 September 2010). "Proposed South Australian hospital cuts a disaster for rural communities". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  44. ^ Bryan Littlely (8 April 2011). "Family First plan to pull plug on levies". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  45. ^ Miles Kemp (4 April 2011). "Secret CSIRO report says stormwater could be drinkable". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  46. ^ Robertson, Doug (8 May 2010). "Secret Police Commissioner's inquiries should be made public". The Advertiser. News Ltd. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  47. ^ Miles Kemp (24 January 2011). "'Clean-up' fails to halt security guard drug use, documents show". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
    Miles Kemp (24 January 2011). "'Clean-up' fails to halt security guard drug use". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  48. ^ Vaughan, Joanna (2 May 2009). "Instant jail of up to 25 years for police attackers". The Advertiser. News Ltd. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  49. ^ Novak, Lauren (18 November 2009). "Parliament considers two-years jail for prison smuggling". The Advertiser. News Ltd. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  50. ^ Novak, Lauren (17 February 2010). "Continuous patrols urged to cut rural road toll". The Advertiser. News Ltd. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  51. ^ Candice Keller (19 January 2011). "Guards and CCTV call for schools". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  52. ^ Emmerson, Russell (11 April 2009). "Build police academy at Cheltenham, says Brokenshire". The Advertiser. News Ltd. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  53. ^ Owen, Michael (19 January 2009). "SA Secondary Principals Association wants police in schools". The Advertiser. News Ltd. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  54. ^ Candice Keller (23 November 2010). "Parents face court on truancy crackdown". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  55. ^ Robertson, Doug (7 June 2010). "Deadly curse of state's popular southern roads". The Advertiser. News Ltd. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  56. ^ Julian Swallow (25 June 2011). "Have hoon-car laws misfired". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  57. ^ Ken McGregor (24 May 2011). "Prison staff bully claims denied by prisons' boss". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  58. ^ Sean Fewster (6 April 2011). "Call to rewrite flawed hoon laws after courts stops car crushing". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  59. ^ Miles Kemp (10 January 2011). "Housing Trust homes vacant for a month on average". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  60. ^ David Jean (20 April 2011). "Boost security to protect staff and patients, says AMA". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  61. ^ "Last ditch legal bid over Seaford Heights". Southern Times Messenger. News Ltd. 28 June 2011. 
  62. ^ Bryan Littlely (9 October 2010). "Monsignor Cappo was aware of Parks Community Centre sale plan". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  63. ^ David Nankervis (20 March 2011). "Public servants rack up $8.5 million in damages to government cars". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  64. ^ Robert Brokenshire (1 December 2008). "We must keep our democratic watchdog". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  65. ^ David Nankervis (13 February 2011). "Schoolkids at risk as new-build defects rise". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  66. ^ Daniel Wills (24 June 2011). "Rann creates post for Russell Wortley after replacing Bernie Finnigan". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  67. ^ Sarah Martin (2 June 2011). "Consumer report six months overdue". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  68. ^ "Call for suicide attention in Budget". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 3 June 2011. 
  69. ^ Bryan Littlely (8 June 2011). "Urban sprawl threat to food bowls". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  70. ^ Greg Kelton (10 February 2011). "Scrap longer daylight saving - MP". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 
  71. ^ "MP keen for early polls by petition". ABC. 25 July 2011. 
  72. ^ Hon Robert Brokenshire MLC (4 March 2009). "South Australia Independent Commission Against Corruption Bill 2009". austlii. 
  73. ^ Nigel Hunt (5 June 2011). "$4m to launch ICAC in Budget". AdelaideNow (The Advertiser online). News Ltd. 

Related pages[edit]

External links[edit]