Robert Burwell Fulton

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Robert Burwell Fulton
7th Chancellor of the University of Mississippi
In office
1892–1906
Preceded by Edward Mayes
Succeeded by Andrew Armstrong Kincannon
Personal details
Born April 8, 1849
Sumter County, Alabama
Died May 29, 1919(1919-05-29) (aged 70)
Oxford, Mississippi
Spouse(s) Annie Rose Garland Fulton
Children Landon Garland Fulton
Louise Garland Fulton
Robert Garland Fulton
Alma mater University of Mississippi

Robert Burwell Fulton (April 8, 1849 – May 29, 1919) was an American university administrator. He served as the seventh Chancellor of the University of Mississippi in Oxford, Mississippi from 1892 to 1906.

Biography[edit]

Early life[edit]

He was born in Sumter County, Alabama on April 8, 1849.[1][2] He graduated from the University of Mississippi in Oxford, Mississippi in 1869.[2]

Career[edit]

He taught in Alabama and in New Orleans, Louisiana.[2] In 1871, he became Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Mississippi in Oxford, Mississippi.[2] By 1875, he was a full Professor.[2] He went on to serve as its seventh Chancellor from 1892 to 1906.[2][3]

Additionally, he served as President of the National Association of State Universities for five years.[2][4]

Personal life[edit]

He married Annie Rose Garland Fulton (1843-1893), the daughter of Landon Garland (1810-1895), who served as the second President of Randolph-Macon College in Ashland, Virginia from 1836 to 1846, third President of the University of Alabama from 1855 to 1865, and first Chancellor of Vanderbilt University from 1875 to 1893.[1] They had two sons and one daughter who died in infancy, and one son who survived:

He died on May 29, 1919.[1][4] He was buried in the Oxford Memorial Cemetery in Oxford, Mississippi.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g FindAGrave: Robert Burwell Fulton
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Ole Miss biography
  3. ^ a b James B. Lloyd, Lives of Mississippi Authors, 1817-1967, Oxford, Mississippi: University Press of Mississippi, 2009, p. 184 [1]
  4. ^ a b The New York Times